Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

Most employers are likely to continue paying for birth control for women. But there are exceptions. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cultured cancer cells from a human cervix, showing numerous blebs (lumps) and microvilli (hair-like structures) characteristic of cancer cells. Cancer of the cervix (the neck of the uterus) is one of the most common cancers affecting women. Magnification: x3000 when printed 10 centimetres wide. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., argued for upholding the Affordable Care Act's birth control provision in 2015. The rollback of the rule is likely to spur further lawsuits, analysts say. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Trump Guts Requirement That Employer Health Plans Pay For Birth Control

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Brandi Chastain celebrates after scoring the winning goal of the 1999 World Cup. Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images

40 Years Of Athletic Support: Happy Anniversary To The Sports Bra

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Throughout the U.S., minors are generally required to have permission from a parent or legal guardian before they can receive most medical treatment. However, each state has established a number of exceptions. PhotoAttractive/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAttractive/Getty Images

Testing for changes in cells of the cervix or for presence of the HPV virus are both good ways to screen for cervical cancer, health organizations say. GARO/Canopy/Getty Images hide caption

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GARO/Canopy/Getty Images

Abortion rights opponents gather during a rally in downtown Louisville earlier this summer. A federal judge issued an order to keep protesters away from a "buffer zone" outside the EMW Women's Surgical Center. Dylan Lovan/AP hide caption

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Dylan Lovan/AP

While many women experience miscarriage, few talk about it openly. But researchers have found there is discussion and a lot of sharing happening on social media. Their hope is that greater public discourse will help reduce stigma and the sense of isolation that some women feel. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, D, center, recently signed a bill into law that would require insurers in the state to cover reproductive health services. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Ariel Levy first wrote about the miscarriage she suffered in Mongolia in the Nov. 17, 2013 issue of The New Yorker. David Klagsbrun/Random House hide caption

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David Klagsbrun/Random House

'I Was Somebody's Mother': Reflections On The Guilt And Grief Of Miscarriage

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Lara Hogan developed preeclampsia when she was pregnant with her son Zion in 2016. Both are fine now, but she's taking extra precautions to stay healthy. Anna Gorman/California Healthline hide caption

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Anna Gorman/California Healthline

Women With High-Risk Pregnancies Are More Likely To Develop Heart Disease

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Mammography has helped increase the early detection of breast tumors. Now, researchers say, the goal is to discern which of those tumors need aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation after surgery. Chicago Tribune/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/Getty Images

Tumor Test Helps Identify Which Breast Cancers Don't Require Extra Treatment

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Women have gotten conflicting advice from doctors about when to have mammograms. Amelie Benoist/Science Source hide caption

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Amelie Benoist/Science Source

OB-GYNs Give Women More Say In When They Have Mammograms

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A new study suggests that some small tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Some Small Tumors In Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All

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Chester with Ivory (left), 11, Skylar (right), 12, and Kameron (center), 21 months. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

In Texas, Abstinence-Only Programs May Contribute To Teen Pregnancies

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths around the world. Thomas Fredberg/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Thomas Fredberg/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Overlooked Drug Could Save Thousands Of Moms After Childbirth

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