Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

The author of a new book, Doing Harm, argues that a pattern of gender bias in medicine means women's pain may be going undiagnosed. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

How 'Bad Medicine' Dismisses And Misdiagnoses Women's Symptoms

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Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

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Virginia Harrod, an attorney and county prosecutor who lives in rural Kentucky, survived breast cancer, only to develop lymphedema, which sent her to the hospital three times with serious infections. A lymph node transplant helped restore her immune system. Luke Sharrett for NPR hide caption

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Luke Sharrett for NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

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Several Planned Parenthood chapters and other groups involved in prevention of teen pregnancy are suing the administration for halting funding for their programs. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Trump Administration Sued Over Ending Funding Of Teen Pregnancy Programs

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Jessica Porten went to a doctor's appointment with her daughter, Kira, to get help with postpartum depression. She soon found herself in the company of police who escorted her to a hospital's emergency department. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Nurse Calls Cops After Woman Seeks Help For Postpartum Depression. Right Call?

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When Jenna Sauter's youngest son, Axel, tested positive for THC — marijuana's active ingredient — after he was born, she got a home visit from local social services. Sauter says she and her friends don't smoke near their children. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Is Smoking Pot While Pregnant Safe For The Baby?

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Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

If a bill in the California Legislature become law, campus health centers at public universities would be required to provide abortion pills. Phil Walter/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Walter/Getty Images

Opponents of abortion rights rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court during The March for Life on Friday in Washington, D.C. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Throughout the U.S., minors are generally required to have permission from a parent or legal guardian before they can receive most medical treatment. However, each state has established a number of exceptions. PhotoAttractive/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Some Teen Moms Can't Get The Pain Relief They Choose In Childbirth

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