Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

When Jenna Sauter's youngest son, Axel, tested positive for THC — marijuana's active ingredient — after he was born, she got a home visit from local social services. Sauter says she and her friends don't smoke near their children. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Is Smoking Pot While Pregnant Safe For The Baby?

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Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

If a bill in the California Legislature become law, campus health centers at public universities would be required to provide abortion pills. Phil Walter/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Walter/Getty Images

Opponents of abortion rights rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court during The March for Life on Friday in Washington, D.C. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Throughout the U.S., minors are generally required to have permission from a parent or legal guardian before they can receive most medical treatment. However, each state has established a number of exceptions. PhotoAttractive/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAttractive/Getty Images

Why Some Teen Moms Can't Get The Pain Relief They Choose In Childbirth

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Feel In Danger On A Date? These Apps Could Help You Stay Safe

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Most employers are likely to continue paying for birth control for women. But there are exceptions. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cultured cancer cells from a human cervix, showing numerous blebs (lumps) and microvilli (hair-like structures) characteristic of cancer cells. Cancer of the cervix (the neck of the uterus) is one of the most common cancers affecting women. Magnification: x3000 when printed 10 centimetres wide. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., argued for upholding the Affordable Care Act's birth control provision in 2015. The rollback of the rule is likely to spur further lawsuits, analysts say. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Trump Guts Requirement That Employer Health Plans Pay For Birth Control

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Brandi Chastain celebrates after scoring the winning goal of the 1999 World Cup. Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images

40 Years Of Athletic Support: Happy Anniversary To The Sports Bra

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