Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

Dr. George Papanicolaou discovered that it was possible to detect cancer by inspecting cervical cells. The Pap smear, the cervical cancer screening test, is named after him. American Cancer Society/AP hide caption

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American Cancer Society/AP

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends mammograms every other year, while the American Cancer Society endorses annual scans. Kari Lehr/Image Zoo/Corbis hide caption

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Kari Lehr/Image Zoo/Corbis

Richard Harris discusses mammogram guidelines

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Catharine Becker of Fullerton, Calif., was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 43 despite having a clean mammogram. The mother of three didn't know she had dense breast tissue until after she was diagnosed. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News
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Women Having A Heart Attack Don't Get Treatment Fast Enough

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A view of the eastern entrance to the Ohio Statehouse. Bob Hall/Flickr hide caption

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Bob Hall/Flickr

States Aim To Restrict Medically Induced Abortions

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States Fund Pregnancy Centers That Discourage Abortion

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The University of Oregon is under fire from students and some employees for turning a student's mental-health records over to its lawyers. Rick Obst/Flickr hide caption

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Rick Obst/Flickr

College Rape Case Shows A Key Limit To Medical Privacy Law

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University of Notre Dame contends that the act of signing a form opting out of the Affordable Care Act's birth control mandate makes the school complicit in providing coverage. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Kristen Caminiti cuddles her son Connor while doctors stitch her up following a C-section. Courtesy of Kristen DeBoy Caminiti hide caption

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Courtesy of Kristen DeBoy Caminiti

The Gentle Cesarean: More Like A Birth Than An Operation

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An interauterine device provides long-term birth control. iStockphoto hide caption

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Colorado Debates Whether IUDs Are Contraception Or Abortion

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Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman's ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra "batteries." But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Fertility Clinic Courts Controversy With Treatment That Recharges Eggs

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