Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

Marlene Simpson of Sacramento, Calif., wears compression bandages daily to help reduce the swelling in her legs. She is getting fitted for compression bandages for her arms to prevent swelling there. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Lesley McClurg/KQED

These Women Discovered It Wasn't Just Fat: It Was Lipedema

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495632851/506118938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The range of preventive health services covered without a copay could be extended to include condoms and vasectomies. Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images

Since marijuana doesn't benefit mother or baby it should be avoided, researchers say. But there is stronger evidence for the harms of alcohol and tobacco. Roy Morsch/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roy Morsch/Getty Images

Women may have different ways of coping with childhood stresses than men, which may increase their risk of health problems in adulthood. Jutta Klee/Uppercut/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jutta Klee/Uppercut/Getty Images

Health insurance plans may exclude coverage for many types of genetic testing that aren't required by law. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Brookes/Getty Images

Acetaminophen, which is sold under the brand name Tylenol, may carry underappreciated risks. But teasing out their magnitude is a challenge. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

When Pregnant Women Need Medicine, They Encounter A Void

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486907088/489138644" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Women often save up questions for an annual office visit that they think don't warrant a sick visit to the doctor during the year, research finds. Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images

Woman holding the dapivirine vaginal ring. Andrew Loxley/International Partnership for Microbicides hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Loxley/International Partnership for Microbicides

The HIV Trap: A Woman's Lack Of Control

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486180093/487380978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Breasts deemed "dense" in a mammogram tend to have less fatty tissue and more connective tissue, breast ducts and glands, doctors say. About 40 percent of women between the ages of 40 and 74 have dense breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Women go through a lot in the delivery of a healthy baby. But in most cases, doctors say, an episiotomy needn't be part of the experience. Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images