Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health
Stories About

Women's Health

"I also learned that designated nursing spaces didn't exist until Nancy Pelosi became Speaker of the House in 2007. This story often repeats itself: multiple organizations have changed their breastfeeding policies in recent years, but only when women came into leadership roles." Ayumi Takahashi for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ayumi Takahashi for NPR

Guidelines for cervical cancer screening have changed to allow HPV testing alone for women over 30. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Getty Images

For Cervical Cancer Screening, Women Over 30 Can Now Choose The HPV Test Only

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/640514865/640630633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vaginal pain and dryness are common symptoms of menopause. Recent research suggests certain types of laser treatment might help when hormones don't. Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images

Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images

Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630688342/631626895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Concussions from domestic violence are sometimes overlooked in patient care. MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images

Domestic Violence's Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613779769/615585154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Katie Merriam, an OB-GYN resident in Charlotte, N.C., says she loves her mostly female work environment but also appreciates having male colleagues. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Olgin/WFAE

Male OB-GYNs Are Rare, But Is That A Problem?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/596396698/607996881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The author of a new book, Doing Harm, argues that a pattern of gender bias in medicine means women's pain may be going undiagnosed. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

How 'Bad Medicine' Dismisses And Misdiagnoses Women's Symptoms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/597159133/597344748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/592225598/594839365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript