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Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

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Dr. Rebecca Gomperts says the government has seized abortion drugs she has prescribed from overseas to patients in the U.S. The drugs are approved by the FDA to induce abortion under a doctor's direction. Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Mahmee CEO Melissa Hanna (right) and her mother, Linda Hanna (left), co-founded the company in 2014. Linda's more than 40 years of clinical experience as a registered nurse and certified lactation consultant helped them understand the need, they say. Keith Alcantara/Mahmee hide caption

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Keith Alcantara/Mahmee

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

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In the Tennessee Capitol, state Rep. Matthew Hill took heat from abortion-rights proponents last month who had gathered to protest a bill he favored that would ban abortions after about six weeks' pregnancy. That legislation was eventually thwarted in the Tennessee Senate, however, when some of his fellow Republicans voted it down, fearing the high cost of court challenges. Sergio Martinez-Beltran/WPLN hide caption

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Sergio Martinez-Beltran/WPLN

Republican State Lawmakers Split Over Anti-Abortion Strategy

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"The optimist in me says in three years we can train this tool to read mammograms as well as an average radiologist," says Connie Lehman, chief of breast imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Training A Computer To Read Mammograms As Well As A Doctor

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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology says suggestions that a medical abortion can be reversed after more than an hour has passed aren't supported by scientific evidence. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

For most of us, the benefits of a walk greatly outweigh the risks, doctors say. Get off the couch now. Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images

Walk Your Dog, But Watch Your Footing: Bone Breaks Are On The Rise

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Thirty-three-year-old mother Kim Nelson started a vaccine advocacy group in Greenville, S.C., to help reach vaccine-hesitant families. Here, she prepares vaccine information flyers for public school students. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

A Parent-To-Parent Campaign To Get Vaccine Rates Up

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Chronic pain is just one health concern women can struggle with after giving birth. Some who have complicated pregnancies or deliveries can experience long-lasting effects to their physical and mental health, researchers find. Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images

Lisa Abramson holds her firstborn child, Lucy, in 2014. A few weeks after Lucy's birth, Abramson began feeling confused and then started developing delusions — symptoms of postpartum psychosis. Courtesy of Claire Mulkey hide caption

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Courtesy of Claire Mulkey

She Wanted To Be The Perfect Mom, Then Landed In A Psychiatric Unit

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Dr. Lisa Hofler runs a University of New Mexico clinic that stocks mifepristone but doesn't routinely provide prenatal care. She and her colleagues can schedule same-day appointments for women diagnosed with miscarriages elsewhere. Adria Malcolm for NPR hide caption

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Adria Malcolm for NPR