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Influenza covers its shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

In August 2014, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, talked with Doctors Without Borders staff during a visit to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Clockwise from top left: Bad selfie; "tree man" disease; Hadza man eating honeycomb; toilet from Amber, India; mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe and deer tick. Clockwise from top left: SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Hadassah; Matthieu Paley/National Geographic; Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street; Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; and Stephen Reiss for NPR. hide caption

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Clockwise from top left: SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Hadassah; Matthieu Paley/National Geographic; Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street; Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; and Stephen Reiss for NPR.

The medical community has reason for cautious optimism in fighting the Ebola virus in Democratic Republic of the Congo: A new vaccine has been created since the 2014 West Africa outbreak. Frederick Murphy/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP hide caption

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Frederick Murphy/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP

Close-up of tzoallis being made during a summer nutrition workshop held by Puente a la Salud, a group based in Oaxaca, Mexico, that is helping to push an amaranth comeback. An ancient Aztec staple, tzoallis are made of amaranth and corn flour, agave honey and amaranth cereal. Courtesy of Puente a la Salud Comunitaria hide caption

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Courtesy of Puente a la Salud Comunitaria

Fishermen in Papua New Guinea, living on their boats, wait for the tide to change before going out to fish. Tuberculosis is a major health threat in the Pacific Ocean nation. Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Zubair, who was diagnosed with a bone tumor and had part of his leg amputated, uses morphine to manage his pain. "Because of morphine I am surviving," he says. With the pain relief, he can ride his motorbike and work at a coffee shop. Screengrab from "Using Morphine To Stay Alive" hide caption

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Screengrab from "Using Morphine To Stay Alive"

A girl carries a child in the outskirts of Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. That's one of the countries in sub-Saharan Africa that has made good progress in reducing child mortality. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images