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Physicians Nowiba Mugambi and Erica Palys discuss a patient's X-ray at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. The hospital plans to open a new cancer treatment center in April. Evelyn Hockstein/Courtesy of AMPATH hide caption

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Evelyn Hockstein/Courtesy of AMPATH

Smoke rises from chimneys of coal-based power plants in the Sonbhadra District of Uttar Pradesh, India. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Young Indians Learn To Fight Pollution To Save Lives

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Burmese migrant Thazin Mon Htay and her father Ko Ngwe Htay were trafficked to Thailand to peel shrimp. They worked 16-hour shifts, seven days a week, for less than $10 a day, Ko Ngwe told PBS NewsHour. Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR hide caption

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Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR

The rapid Ebola test from Corgenix Medical Corporation is small and easy to use. But because it involves blood, health workers would still need to run the test at a lab to stay safe. Courtesy of Corgenix Medical Corp. hide caption

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Courtesy of Corgenix Medical Corp.

A health worker with Doctors Without Borders carries a child suspected of having Ebola at the treatment center in Paynesville, Liberia, last October. Ebola is especially deadly for young children and babies. About 4 in 5 infected died. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Grandpa Who Saved His Granddaughter From Ebola

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You want that soda bottle. But it may not be because you crave soda. It might just be that you love the idea of wrapping your fingers around its enticing shape. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Dr. Kwan Kew Lai volunteered for six weeks at an Ebola treatment center run by International Medical Corps in Bong, Liberia. Courtesy of Kwan Kew Lai hide caption

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Courtesy of Kwan Kew Lai

The Ebola Diaries: Trying To Heal Patients You Can't Touch

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Random violence in Syria makes it a dangerous place for aid workers. This month, members of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent transported Syrians from a rebel area to a part of Aleppo controlled by the Assad regime. Baraa Al-Halabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Baraa Al-Halabi/AFP/Getty Images

This World Health Organization map shows the percent of the population vaccinated for measles in each country in 2013. Dark green is at least 90 percent. Light green is 80 to 89 percent. Orange is 50 to 79 percent. Red is less than 50 percent. Courtesy of WHO hide caption

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Courtesy of WHO

Dr. Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization, has said of Ebola: "It overwhelmed the capacity of WHO, and it is a crisis that cannot be solved by a single agency or single country." Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

Critics Say Ebola Crisis Was WHO's Big Failure. Will Reform Follow?

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The number of children who need glasses has risen quickly across East Asia and Southeast Asia. But some parents and doctors in China are skeptical of lenses. They think glasses weaken children's vision. Imaginechina/Corbis hide caption

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Imaginechina/Corbis

Why Is Nearsightedness Skyrocketing Among Chinese Youth?

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Writer Roald Dahl and his wife, actress Patricia Neal, with two of their children, Theo and Chantel Sophia "Tessa." The photo was taken a few years after oldest daughter, Olivia, died of measles. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A nurse administers an experimental Ebola vaccine Monday at Redemption Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. Researchers aim to give shots to 27,000 people during the large trial. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Lack Of Patients Hampers Ebola Drug And Vaccine Testing

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