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Boys show off their four-legged friends at a rabies vaccination drive set up by the Serengeti Health Initiative in the Bariadi District of Tanzania. Anna Czupryna/Courtesy of Serengeti Health Initiative hide caption

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Anna Czupryna/Courtesy of Serengeti Health Initiative

Liberian physician Martha Zarway continues work in a temporary clinic while her original facility is disinfected. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Martha Zarway Of Monrovia: 'I'm A Doctor, So We Can't Run Away'

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Abortions are legal in India. But many are performed by traditional midwives, called dais. Sometimes a dai rubs herbs on a woman's stomach or gives her plants to eat. Poulomi Basu for NPR hide caption

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Poulomi Basu for NPR

Five ambulances, donated by the U.S. to help combat Ebola, are lined up after a ceremony attended by Sierra Leone's president, Ernest Bai Koroma, in Freetown on Sept. 10. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

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Michael Duff/AP

Promised Help To Fight Ebola Arriving At 'Speed Of A Turtle'

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Chlorine can stop the Ebola virus. So medical workers disinfect their hands often at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Inside An Ebola Kit: A Little Chlorine And A Lot Of Hope

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Source: Columbia Prediction of Infectious Diseases, World Health Organization Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

A Frightening Curve: How Fast Is The Ebola Outbreak Growing?

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Workers unload medical supplies to fight the Ebola epidemic from a USAID cargo flight in Harbel, Liberia, in August. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Obama To Announce Buildup In U.S. Efforts To Fight Ebola

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Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3. Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

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Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, has been working on and off in Liberia for 15 years. He went back to Monrovia in August to help deliver babies. It's still unknown how he caught Ebola. Courtesy of SIM hide caption

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Courtesy of SIM

US soldiers have intervened in during natural disasters such as the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. But a disease outbreak is more complicated. SSgt. Chad Chisholm/U.S. Dept. of Defense hide caption

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SSgt. Chad Chisholm/U.S. Dept. of Defense

Can The U.S. Military Turn The Tide In The Ebola Outbreak?

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Not every business has been hurt by the Ebola epidemic: Stephen Kollie says his newspaper stand is thriving because people are hungry for the latest Ebola information. But many of his usual expatriate customers have left the country, he says. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Fast-Moving Ebola Slows Down Liberia's Economy

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Ebola has spread through Monrovia, Liberia's congested capital city. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Changing Face Of West Africa Has Fueled The Ebola Crisis

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