Fitness & Nutrition : Shots - Health News Fitness & Nutrition

Archaeologists have suggested that Stone Age people sometimes ate one another for nutritional reasons. But a new study suggests that from a calorie perspective, hunting and eating other humans wasn't efficient. Publiphoto/Science Source hide caption

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Publiphoto/Science Source

Would having to wait 25 seconds for your snack prompt you to make healthier choices at the vending machine? New research suggests the answer is yes. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Eating too much bacon, or too few whole grains, nuts and seeds, can influence your risk of death from heart disease. Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are linked to diet. Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images

A woman farmers harvests pearl millet in Andhra Pradesh, India. Millets were once a steady part of Indians' diets until the Green Revolution, which encouraged farmers to grow wheat and rice. Now, the grains are slowly making a comeback. Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar hide caption

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Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar

Monica Bill Barnes (left) and Anna Bass are offering literally breathtaking tours of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Paula Lobo/The Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

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Paula Lobo/The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Raise Your (He)art Rate With A Workout At The Met

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Interval training includes bursts of high-intensity efforts sandwiched by periods of less activity. Jonathan Cohen/Flickr hide caption

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Jonathan Cohen/Flickr

Does 1-Minute Interval Training Work? We Ask The Guy Who Tested It

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Yes, getting exercise and eating right can significantly cut your risk of developing heart disease, a study finds, even if you inherited genes that predispose you to the illness. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The researchers were inspired by working with ultramarathoners, who can be sidelined by blisters despite years of training. These runners competed in the 2007 Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley, Calif. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP