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Infectious Disease

Biologist Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project, recently moved the project to the University of California, San Diego's School of Medicine. Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado hide caption

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Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado

Bruno Mbango Enyaka gets his flu shot at a community health center in Portland, Maine, on Jan. 7. Gabe Souza/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Press Herald via Getty Images

This Year's Flu Vaccine Is Pretty Wimpy, But Can Still Help

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Ignaz Semmelweis washing his hands in chlorinated lime water before operating. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Bettmann/Corbis

The Doctor Who Championed Hand-Washing And Briefly Saved Lives

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You don't want to run into methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria. A potential new antibiotic could help fight this bug. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Scientists Hit Antibiotic Pay Dirt Growing Finicky Bacteria In Lab

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A woman protects her child's face in Managua, Nicaragua, as health workers fumigate for mosquitoes that carry chikungunya. The virus started spreading through Nicaragua and Mexico in the fall. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Painful Virus Sweeps Central America, Gains A Toehold In U.S.

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Last fall's state-ordered quarantine of nurse Kaci Hickox (shown here with her boyfriend, Theodore Michael Wilbur, in late October) started at the airport in Newark, N.J., then followed her home to Fort Kent, Maine. Hickox treated Ebola patients in Africa but never had the illness. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Ebola Aid Workers Still Avoiding New York And New Jersey

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The hepatitis C medication Sovaldi, from Gilead Sciences, costs $1,000 per pill. It's just one of the new medications introduced in the past year that can cure the disease within weeks or months. Courtesy of Gilead Sciences via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of Gilead Sciences via AP

Costly Hepatitis C Drugs Threaten To Bust Prison Budgets

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