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A hand-drawn map on the wall of a rural clinic shows health workers where a woman with Ebola may be hiding. Kelly McEvers/NPR hide caption

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Kelly McEvers/NPR

As Ebola Pingpongs In Liberia, Cases Disappear Into The Jungle

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Dr. Komba Songu M'Briwah, left, talks on the phone while staff members disinfect offices at the Hastings Ebola Treatment Center in Freetown. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

An Ebola Clinic Figures Out A Way To Start Beating The Odds

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India has record no Ebola cases, but the country is on high alert and has quarantined hundreds of travelers from West Africa. This hospital in New Delhi has set up an Intensive Care Unit for potential Ebola patients. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images

Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome virus particles cling to the surface of an infected cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/Flickr

How A Tilt Toward Safety Stopped A Scientist's Virus Research

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A woman on the L train in New York City last week covers her face, fearful because a doctor with Ebola rode the train days earlier. Epidemiologists say people on the subway were not at risk. Stephen Nessen /WNYC hide caption

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Stephen Nessen /WNYC

New York's Disease Detectives Hit The Street In Search Of Ebola

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Caribous doing their business in mountain ice have left a viral record hundreds of years old. Courtesy of Brian Moorman hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Moorman

Ancient Viruses Lurk In Frozen Caribou Poo

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