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Infectious Disease

The hepatitis C medication Sovaldi, from Gilead Sciences, costs $1,000 per pill. It's just one of the new medications introduced in the past year that can cure the disease within weeks or months. Courtesy of Gilead Sciences via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of Gilead Sciences via AP

Costly Hepatitis C Drugs Threaten To Bust Prison Budgets

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Members of the community in New Georgia Signboard greet President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf Monday for the launch of the Ebola Must Go! campaign. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

'Ebola Must Go' — And So Must Prejudice Against Survivors

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A worker puts the finishing touches on the dividers that will separate patients at the community care center in the Port Loko district of Sierra Leone. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

World's Slow Response To Ebola Leaves Sierra Leone Villages Scrambling

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Viruses can spread through the air in two ways: inside large droplets that fall quickly to the ground (red), or inside tiny droplets that float in the air (gray). In the first route, called droplet transmission, the virus can spread only about 3 to 6 feet from an infected person. In the second route, called airborne transmission, the virus can travel 30 feet or more. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

A hand-drawn map on the wall of a rural clinic shows health workers where a woman with Ebola may be hiding. Kelly McEvers/NPR hide caption

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Kelly McEvers/NPR

As Ebola Pingpongs In Liberia, Cases Disappear Into The Jungle

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Dr. Komba Songu M'Briwah, left, talks on the phone while staff members disinfect offices at the Hastings Ebola Treatment Center in Freetown. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

An Ebola Clinic Figures Out A Way To Start Beating The Odds

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