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Who, me? The Asian relative of this domestic gerbil is a well-known host to the bacteria that cause plague. Valentina Storti/Flickr hide caption

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Valentina Storti/Flickr

Gerbils Likely Pushed Plague To Europe in Middle Ages

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The rapid Ebola test from Corgenix Medical Corporation is small and easy to use. But because it involves blood, health workers would still need to run the test at a lab to stay safe. Courtesy of Corgenix Medical Corp. hide caption

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Courtesy of Corgenix Medical Corp.

One form of carbapenem-resistant bacteria seen in culture. CRE bacteria are blamed for 600 deaths a year in the U.S. and can withstand treatment by virtually every kind of antibiotic. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Measles is highly contagious, and it produces fever and rash in susceptible people who become infected. Hazel Appleton/Health Protection Agency Centre/Science Source hide caption

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Hazel Appleton/Health Protection Agency Centre/Science Source

Why A Court Once Ordered Kids Vaccinated Against Their Parents' Will

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Tobacco smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to die from infection, kidney disease and, maybe, breast cancer. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Smoking's Death Toll May Be Higher Than Anyone Knew

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Dr. Kwan Kew Lai volunteered for six weeks at an Ebola treatment center run by International Medical Corps in Bong, Liberia. Courtesy of Kwan Kew Lai hide caption

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Courtesy of Kwan Kew Lai

The Ebola Diaries: Trying To Heal Patients You Can't Touch

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Measles vaccine isn't a part of most workplaces. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Can Employers Require Workers To Be Vaccinated? It Depends

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The Pseudomonas stutzeri bacterium, commonly found in soil, was the most prevalent subway microbe. Lower Manhattan was its prime hangout. Mason/Cell Systems 2015 hide caption

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Mason/Cell Systems 2015

Leah Russin, of Palo Alto, Calif., holds her son, Leo, 16 months, as she speaks Wednesday at a news conference in support of proposed state legislation that would require parents to vaccinate all school children. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Measles Outbreak Sparks Bid To Strengthen Calif. Vaccine Law

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Jackie Carnegie immunizes Mabel Haywood in a Colorado Health Department immunization van in 1972. Shots for measles and other infectious diseases were offered. Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post Archive/Getty Images

Writer Roald Dahl and his wife, actress Patricia Neal, with two of their children, Theo and Chantel Sophia "Tessa." The photo was taken a few years after oldest daughter, Olivia, died of measles. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images
KQED

A Boy Who Had Cancer Faces Measles Risk From The Unvaccinated

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