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A patient at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has a confirmed case of Ebola, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. He is being treated and kept in strict isolation. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Biohazard suits used to handle dangerous microbes hang in a laboratory at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Fort Detrick, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Low water levels, like at this reservoir near Gustine, Calif., bring birds and mosquitoes together and help transmit West Nile virus to humans. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Chlorine can stop the Ebola virus. So medical workers disinfect their hands often at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Inside An Ebola Kit: A Little Chlorine And A Lot Of Hope

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Source: Columbia Prediction of Infectious Diseases, World Health Organization Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

A Frightening Curve: How Fast Is The Ebola Outbreak Growing?

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San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener (left) says he started taking a drug to prevent HIV infection earlier this year. Lisa Aliferis/KQED hide caption

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Lisa Aliferis/KQED

Workers unload medical supplies to fight the Ebola epidemic from a USAID cargo flight in Harbel, Liberia, in August. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Obama To Announce Buildup In U.S. Efforts To Fight Ebola

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Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3. Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

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Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, has been working on and off in Liberia for 15 years. He went back to Monrovia in August to help deliver babies. It's still unknown how he caught Ebola. Courtesy of SIM hide caption

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Courtesy of SIM

PCR tests like this can tell if a virus is an enterovirus, but they can't ID the new virus that has caused a surge in serious respiratory infections. BSIP / Science Source hide caption

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BSIP / Science Source

13-year-old Will Cornejo of Lone Tree, Colo., recovers at Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in Denver from what doctors suspect is enterovirus 68. His parents found him unconscious on the couch and called 911. He was flown to Denver for treatment. Cyrus McCrimmon/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyrus McCrimmon/Denver Post/Getty Images

A security man takes visitors' temperatures Wednesday at the Transcorp Hilton hotel in Abuja, Nigeria, about 400 miles north of Port Harcourt. Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters/Landov