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Former Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon speaks during a press conference in February at Bute House in Edinburgh. Sturgeon has been arrested by police investigating the finances of Scotland's pro-independence governing party. Jane Barlow/AP hide caption

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Jane Barlow/AP

The hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, leaves Balmoral as it begins its journey to Edinburgh. Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

Voters arrive Thursday at the War Memorial building being used as a polling station in Aboyne in Aberdeenshire for Scotland's parliamentary election. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

Supporters of Scottish independence gather at the site of the Battle of Bannockburn in August in Bannockburn, Scotland. The site is where the army of the king of Scots, Robert the Bruce, defeated the army of England's King Edward II in 1314 in the First War of Scottish Independence. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Support For Scottish Independence Is Growing, Partly Due To U.K.'s COVID-19 Response

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Activists rally outside the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh in February in support of legislation for free period products. Scotland will make these products free to all who need them after lawmakers unanimously passed a bill that will require tampons and pads to be available in public places. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Scottish Parliament member Monica Lennon (right) joins supporters of the Period Products bill she sponsored, at a rally outside Parliament in Edinburgh on Tuesday. The legislation would make Scotland the first country in the world to make products like pads and tampons freely available. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

Scottish National Party leader and Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is calling for a second referendum on Scottish independence, saying voters endorsed the idea during the U.K.'s recent elections. Sturgeon is seen here Thursday at Bute House in Edinburgh. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Scotland Seeks New Vote On Independence As U.K. Hurtles Toward Brexit

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Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson gets off his election campaign bus — emblazoned with the slogan "Get Brexit Done" — to visit Washington, England, on Monday. Britain goes to the polls on Thursday. Ben Stansall/AP hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AP

The mobile library travels on one of its routes on the Outer Hebrides island of Lewis and Harris. For isolated residents, seeing the mobile librarian is sometimes the only human contact they may have for days. Celeste Noche hide caption

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Celeste Noche

A gray wolf in Jamtland County, Sweden. A wealthy landowner in Scotland is hoping to bring wolves from Sweden to the Scottish Highlands to thin the herd of red deer. Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped Out

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Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and Deputy First Minister John Swinney arrive at Scottish Parliament on Tuesday. They attended the second day of debate on a motion that ultimately granted Sturgeon the authority to pursue an independence referendum. Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images

A barren, empty stretch of Scottish highlands, much like the one Eden's contestants made their lives in for a full year. Also, a reasonably accurate depiction of the show's audience these past few months (read: no one). Arterra/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Arterra/UIG via Getty Images

An 18th-century etching by artist John Kay depicts the extra tall Charles Byrne, the extra short George Cranstoun and three contemporaries of more conventional height. Byrne made his living as a professional spectacle and died at age 22 in 1783. Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images hide caption

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Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images

The Saga Of The Irish Giant's Bones Dismays Medical Ethicists

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Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon leaves 10 Downing Street in London after a meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May about Brexit negotiations in November 2016. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP