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A man casts his vote at a polling station on Sunday in Tetovo, Macedonia. Macedonians all across the country went to the polls to vote in a referendum to change the country's name to the Republic of North Macedonia and end a long running dispute with Greece. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

A wildfire raged near the Moria refugee camp, pictured here, on Greece's Lesbos Island. The camp is home to an estimated 9,000 migrants and refugees. ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

Tourists take pictures of slogans on a wall in central Athens on Satuday. Greece's third and final bailout officially ends on Monday after years of hugely unpopular and stinging austerity measures. Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Wildfires left behind burned-out shells of homes in the village of Mati, near Athens. Greek Red Cross workers discovered 26 bodies in the devastated resort village. Savvas Karmaniolas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Savvas Karmaniolas/AFP/Getty Images

'A Terrible Day': Greek Wildfires Kill At Least 74 People, Devastate Resort Village

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Macedonia will now be named Republic of North Macedonia after its prime minister reached an agreement with his Greek counterpart. A monument to Alexander the Great is seen in the center of Skopje on Sunday. Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images

Rasha al-Ahmad, 25, washes her hands with donated bottled water inside a tent her family put up next to the Moria refugee camp. Her 1-year-old daughter, Tamar, is next to her. "The biggest challenge is keeping myself and my children clean," she says. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Greek protesters in Thessaloniki wave flags and banners during a rally against the use of the term "Macedonia" for the neighboring country's name on Jan. 21. Greek authorities argue that the name Macedonia might suggest that Skopje has territorial claims to the northern Greek region of the same name with Thessaloniki as its capital. Giannis Papanikos/AP hide caption

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Giannis Papanikos/AP

Tuba and Cevheri Guven, both journalists, fled to Thessaloniki after being targeted by their own government. Turkey has imprisoned 262 journalists, making it the world's largest jailer of journalists. "If you write something on Twitter, you can go directly to prison," Tuba says. Joanna Kakissis/For NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/For NPR

Turks Fleeing To Greece Find Mostly Warm Welcome, Despite History

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Flash floods killed at least 20 people in Greece, in a storm some were calling a "medicane." A woman cleans mud in front of a house in the town of Mandra, northwest of Athens, on Friday. Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images

An English couple on vacation in Greece composed this note, rolled it up in a bottle and, on July 4, tossed it into the Mediterranean Sea. A Palestinian fisherman caught it in his net this week. Photo Courtesy of Wael Al Soltan hide caption

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Photo Courtesy of Wael Al Soltan

From Greece, A Message In A Bottle Reaches Isolated Gaza

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A view of the newly-erected wind turbine on Tilos, Greece, part of a microgrid that, along with a solar park and a renewable battery system, will power the island. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Why Greece Has Been Slow To Embrace Clean Energy

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Residents leave their houses in Thessaloniki, Greece, on Sunday as part of a mandatory evacuation. It preceded an operation to defuse a World War II bomb discovered there. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

On Wednesday, a police officer looks into the hole where an unexploded World War II-era bomb was found during work on a gas station's underground tanks. The city plans a massive evacuation Sunday to defuse and remove the bomb. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters hold Greek flags, including one saying "No," during a demonstration at the Greek parliament on July 5, marking the first anniversary of a referendum in which Greeks voted against austerity. Soon after the vote, the prime minister accepted a new bailout deal for Greece imposing even tougher austerity than before. Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

With Brexit, Greeks Worry About Europe's Future And Their Place In It

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Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the shipwreck, while decompressing after a dive of 165 feet beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Greece. Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO hide caption

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Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO

Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

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Police officers patrol among tents during evacuation operations Tuesday at the Idomeni camp near the Greek-Macedonian border. Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images

Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers

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