Greece Greece

Greek Orthodox priest Apostolos Stavropoulos, 41, lights a torch inside the mausoleum in the village of Distomo in June 2013 on the eve of the 69th anniversary of the massacre committed by the Nazis during World War II. The remains of the more than 200 villagers killed, including women and children, are kept here. John Kolesidis/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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John Kolesidis/Reuters /Landov

As Greeks And Germans Negotiate Debt, Reparations Issues Resurface

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Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head of the Eurogroup (right) sits next to Roberto Gualtieri, the chairman of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, during a meeting Tuesday at the European Parliament in Brussels. The European Union's executive branch said the list of Greek reform measures for final approval of the extended rescue loans is sufficiently comprehensive to be a valid starting point. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

A worker at Soulis Furs in Kastoria sorts through treated mink pelts. "We buy the pelts — minks or foxes or other animals — from North America and Scandinavia and send them for treatment in factories or abroad," says Makis Gioras of Soulis Furs in Kastoria. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

A Greek City Nervously Watches Its Fur Trade Falter

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A man passes a graffiti in central Athens Friday, as Eurozone finance ministers consider Greece's request to extend the bailout loans that have kept its government afloat. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

Greece's hopes for reaching a new compromise with Eurozone members on the terms of its loans are seen as hinging on promises to reform its economy — and submit to outside inspections. Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (fourth from the left) leads the first cabinet meeting of his government Jan. 28 in Athens. He's been criticized for selecting no women for senior positions. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

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Petros Giannakouris/AP

Even As Progressives Take Lead In Greece, Women Remain Out Of Power

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Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras addresses lawmakers at the Parliament in Athens on Tuesday. Greece is in talks with European finance ministers over its debt. Simela Pantzartzi/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Simela Pantzartzi/EPA/Landov

A woman wrapped in a Greek flag makes her way in to a demonstration to support the new anti-austerity government in Athens on Thursday. Louisa Goulimaki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louisa Goulimaki/AFP/Getty Images

In A Twist, Greeks Demonstrate In Favor Of Their Government

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The leader of Greece's left-wing Syriza party Alexis Tsipras casts his ballot in Athens on Sunday. His anti-austerity party was ahead in earlier polling. Aris Messinis/Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/Getty Images

Foe Of 'Fiscal Waterboarding' Leads Going Into Greek Election

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