Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico

The teal blue area along the Louisiana coastline represents a "dead zone" of oxygen-depleted water. Resulting from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the Mississippi River, it can potentially hurt fisheries. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Getty Images

The Gulf Of Mexico's Dead Zone Is The Biggest Ever Seen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/541222717/541304579" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Zirlott family's oyster farm is at the end of a long pier in Sandy Bay. Legend has it that the name "Murder Point" comes from a deadly dispute over an oyster lease at this site back in 1929. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Debbie Elliott/NPR

7 Years After BP Oil Spill, Oyster Farming Takes Hold In South

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532102196/532350891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life. Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Researchers Test Hotter, Faster And Cleaner Way To Fight Oil Spills

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520861834/520996122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wetlands and marshlands that once protected New Orleans and the surrounding areas from storm surge have been depleted over the years. Here, the $1.1 billion Lake Borgne Surge Barrier outside New Orleans in 2015. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511216472/511267296" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Richie Blink, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La., south of New Orleans, works for the National Wildlife Federation. He got in touch with an archaeologist to take a look at some shards of pottery that were eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. Blink holds a pottery shard that could be 300 to 500 years old, from the Plaquemine culture of what's called the Bayou Petre phase. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

toggle caption
Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505320391/508151270" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fresh oil puddles on the white sand in Orange Beach, Ala., during the BP oil spill in 2010. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Debbie Elliott/NPR

5 Years After BP Oil Spill, Experts Debate Damage To Ecosystem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401288698/401319076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Blue crabs brought back to Tony Goutierrez's dock in Hopedale, La. For the past few years, his traps have been coming up empty. "It's sad to see it go, but it's going — this way of life is going to disappear," he says. Laine Kaplan-Levenson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Laine Kaplan-Levenson for NPR

Shell's Olympus production platform and drilling rig is located about 130 miles south of New Orleans. It is 406 feet tall and weighs more than 120,000 tons. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Up Close And Personal With A 40-Story Oil Rig In The Gulf

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/335282273/338354954" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image provided by NOAA taken at 2:45 a.m. EDT Sunday shows Hurricane Ingrid approaching from the Gulf of Mexico and Tropical Storm Manuel just off the western coast of Mexico. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

An out-of-control natural gas well in the Gulf of Mexico continued to burn Wednesday after it blew out and caught fire. Beams supporting some of the "Hercules 265 jack-up rig" have collapsed. U.S. Coast Guard via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Coast Guard via AP