San Francisco San Francisco

Growing up, Liam Foley (left) was in charge of dishes and never cooked. He was still able to help chop the onions, though, at a burrito-making project for the poor in San Francisco. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt/NPR

Nicotine, heavy metals and tiny particles that can harm the lungs have been found in e-cigarette aerosol, according to the surgeon general. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A man rides a LimeBike in Washington, DC. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

#ScootersBehavingBadly: U.S. Cities Race To Keep Up With Small Vehicle Shares

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Chef Heidi Rae Weinstein holds a Reuben sandwich, complete with Swiss cheese — definitely a kosher no-no — at Trefa Banquet 2.0, an event held in San Francisco to commemorate a scandalous meal held in 1883 by newly ordained rabbis of the Jewish reform movement. The event has practically become myth. Lydia Daniller hide caption

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Lydia Daniller

Despite the disbanding of communes and the persistence of capitalism, culinary contributions from hippies have not only endured, but helped set the framework for the way we eat today. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

Inside the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in its earliest days. The clinic opened on June 7, 1967, and treated 250 patients that day. It's motto, then and now: "Health care is a right, not a privilege." Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives

A 1960s 'Hippie Clinic' In San Francisco Inspired A Medical Philosophy

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The portable toilets in San Francisco's Pit Stop fleet are all staffed by paid attendants during their hours of operation and cleaned frequently. Most of them, however, don't look like the city's famous "Painted Lady" Victorian houses. Courtesy San Francisco Public Works hide caption

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Courtesy San Francisco Public Works

A 2008 photo shows Presidio Terrace, a gated community in San Francisco. A San Jose couple bought the street — a private road — after the homeowners association failed to pay a tax bill. Dale/Flickr hide caption

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Dale/Flickr

UPS employees cross the street shortly after a shooting at the company's facility in San Francisco. According to law enforcement, the suspect killed himself with a gunshot to the head. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

The city of San Francisco has established the new Financial Justice Project to look for ways to make smaller fines, like parking tickets, more fair to poorer residents. Dale Cruse/Flickr hide caption

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Dale Cruse/Flickr

San Francisco Program Aims To Make Fines More Fair For The Poor

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Fatima Avelica, 13, daughter of of Romulo Avelica-Gonzalez, attends a rally with loved ones and supporters for his release outside U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) offices on March 13, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

A group of people walk on Castro Street, in the downtown portion of the Silicon Valley town of Mountain View, California, August 24, 2016. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images). Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The Millennium Tower has gained notoriety as "The Leaning Tower of San Francisco." Residents of the luxury condominium building and the city are suing the developer. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

San Francisco's 'Leaning Tower' Has Residents Fuming

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UCSF is laying off some of its IT staff and sending their jobs to a contractor with headquarters in India. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Outsourced: In A Twist, Some San Francisco IT Jobs Are Moving To India

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