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Customers try out cellphones and tablets in a store in Tehran, in 2012. Financial sanctions make it difficult for U.S. firms to do business in Iran, analysts say. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Politics Overshadows U.S. Tech Firms' Hopes For Entering Iran

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Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks during his meeting with the heads and members of public organizations and professional associations in Damascus, on Sunday. Assad acknowledged that the fight against rebels had suffered setbacks, but vowed to win against insurgents. SANA/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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SANA/Reuters/Landov

Israeli artist Matan Pinkas sits in the "Iranian Embassy in Jerusalem," a cultural project in the works by the Jerusalem art collective Hamabul. Daniel Estrin hide caption

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Daniel Estrin

Torn Between Native And Adoptive Lands, Israel's Iranian Jews Hope For Peace

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People gather opposite Downing Street during a protest against the execution of a young woman in Iran, in October of last year. Amnesty International says that Iran has undergone an "unprecedented spike" in executions in recent months. Graham Mitchell/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Graham Mitchell/Barcroft Media/Landov

The state-run Iran-Khodro plant manufactures vehicles including the Peugeot 206 car, shown on a production line in 2014 near Tehran. Iran's robust auto industry was built in response to sanctions. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

When Sanctions Lift, How Will Iran Spend Its Billions?

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Secretary of State John Kerry spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep at the State Department. Kerry said if Congress or a future president reverses a nuclear control agreement with Iran, U.S. credibility will suffer. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

U.S. Will Lose 'All Credibility' If Congress Rejects Nuclear Deal, Kerry Says

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The U.N. Security Council endorsed the historic Iran nuclear deal on Monday. Now, world leaders — notably in the U.S. and Iran — must garner enough support for the agreement at home. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Parrying Doubts In Two Capitals, Leaders Sell The Iran Nuclear Deal

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Iranian workers transfer goods from a cargo container to trucks in May at the Kalantari port in Chabahar, Iran. The removal of sanctions on Iran under a recent deal with world powers is expected to boost the country's economy, but the agreement was carefully constructed to quickly put those sanctions back in place if Iran is suspected of violations. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

A Look At How Sanctions Would 'Snap Back' If Iran Violates Nuke Deal

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Shourd and fellow hikers Shane Bauer (center) and Josh Fattal held a press conference shortly after Bauer and Fattal were released in 2011. Shourd was released in 2010. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Former Hostage: Under Deal, Iran Has Less Incentive To Hold Americans

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Iranian stockbrokers monitor share prices at the Tehran Stock Exchange in April. The historical Iran nuclear deal could open the country's market up to international investors. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Nuclear Deal Opens Up Potential For Investors In Iran's Stock Market

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To Iranian Business Leader, Nuclear Pact Opens Long-Awaited Opportunities

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A man walks past a poster advertising travel to Tehran, Iran, in Los Angeles on July 14. A nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers lifts some sanctions against Iran, but most U.S. sanctions will remain in place. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

What Lifting Iran's Sanctions Means For U.S. Businesses

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