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Far-right leader and candidate in next spring's French presidential elections, Marine Le Pen, acknowledges applause at a meeting of European nationalists in Koblenz, Germany, last weekend. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

France's Far-Right Candidate For President Is A Contender

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Marie-Antoine Carême began his hardscrabble life in Paris during the French Revolution, but eventually his penchant for design and his baking talent brought him fame and fortune. Wikipedia hide caption

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Wikipedia

The new law was prompted by concerns over the intrusion of work into private lives. Carlina Teteris/Getty Images hide caption

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Carlina Teteris/Getty Images

For French Law On Right To 'Disconnect,' Much Support — And A Few Doubts

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The French government has bulit an exact replica of the prehistoric paintings in Lascaux, next to the originals. This photo was taken in the replicated cave. The originals were painted some 20,000 years ago, but are closed to the public to protect the artwork. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Next To The Original, France Replicates Prehistoric Cave Paintings

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Frenchman Jean Yves Boyer buys a copy of the French weekly Le Canard Enchainé, which marks its 100th anniversary this year. It sells 400,000 copies a week and is profitable, though it has no advertising and just a bare-bones webpage. Courtesy of Rebecca Rosman hide caption

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Courtesy of Rebecca Rosman

Dounia Bouzar, shown here in 2015, helps parents in France who want to prevent their kids from joining militant groups like ISIS — whose recruiters, she says, "set out to break every emotional, social and historical tie in the kids' lives." Charles Platiau/Reuters hide caption

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Charles Platiau/Reuters

Defusing The Lure Of Militant Islam In France, Despite Death Threats

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Mourad Benchellali speaks to a group of students and parents in Strasbourg, France. In 2001 Benchellali traveled to Afghanistan to visit his brother, and was forced into an al-Qaida training camp. He now speaks out against radical Islam. Courtesy of Mourad Benchellali hide caption

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Courtesy of Mourad Benchellali

A French Community Tries To Get A Handle On Radicalization

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Marion Chabrel (center), 37, has taken in two migrants as roommates, Brahim (left), from Bangladesh, and Shabada (right) from Afghanistan. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

For Newly Arrived Migrants, Paris Offers An Upgraded Welcome

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks on Nov. 9 in Berlin, saying that Germany is prepared to work with a Trump administration that respects "democracy, freedom" and human "dignity." Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen arrives to make a statement on Donald Trump's election as president in Nanterre, outside Paris, on Wednesday. She is considered one of the leading candidates in France's 2017 presidential elections. Christophe Ena/AP hide caption

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Christophe Ena/AP

Trump's Election Gives Hope To Europe's Far Right

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Migrants arrive to register for relocation at a temporary facility outside The Jungle refugee camp near the port of Calais, France. The camp known for its squalor housed an estimated 6,100 migrants. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Migrants walk past makeshift shops and shelters at a camp known as "The Jungle" in Calais, France, on Sept. 6. Overcrowding has become an issue in the camp. "I imagined a little camp," says Calais resident Nicole Cordier, who has protested against The Jungle. "Not an immense camp like this one. This is a city." Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

For One French Woman, An Eye-Opening Visit To Calais' Refugee 'Jungle'

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Stuck cable cars hang off the Mont Blanc massif between France and Italy on Friday. Dozens of tourists who were trapped in cable cars dangling above the Alps overnight, including a 10-year-old child, have all been safely rescued. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP