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The U.S. will face its first major test in the Women's World Cup Thursday, as it plays Sweden in the final match of the group stage. U.S. forward Megan Rapinoe is seen here during the U.S. game against Thailand. Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. women stand for the national anthem ahead of an international friendly with Mexico late last month before heading to France for the FIFA Women's World Cup, which kicks off today. Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

U.S. World War II D-Day veteran Tom Rice, from Coronado, Calif., parachutes in a tandem jump into a field in Carentan, Normandy, France, on Wednesday. Approximately 200 parachutists participated in the event, replicating a jump made by U.S. soldiers on June 6, 1944 — D-Day. AP hide caption

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AP

France Won't Take ISIS Fighters Back, But Doesn't Want Them Executed Either

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Union members gather in front of a Paris courthouse on May 6, as several former senior employees of the then-named company France Télécom go on trial for alleged "moral harassment," a decade after a series of suicides occurred at the firm between 2008 and 2009. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

A Decade Ago, Suicides Rocked A French Telecom Firm. Now Its Execs Stand Trial

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French Culture Minister Françoise Nyssen (second right), Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo (center) and women's rights activists hold a banner reading "Maintenant on agit" ("Now we act"), on the eve of International Women's Day on March 7. They aim to raise funds to help women pursue justice, "so that no woman ever again has to say #MeToo." Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

In France, The #MeToo Movement Has Yet To Live Up To Women's Hopes

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Damage seen from inside Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris on Tuesday. President Emmanuel Macron has set a five-year goal to rebuild the cathedral after Monday's blaze. Christophe Petit Tesson/AP hide caption

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Christophe Petit Tesson/AP

Donation Pledges Roll In For Notre Dame's Reconstruction

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In this Feb. 20 photograph, a Nazi sign and words mocking the Holocaust were painted on a tombstone at the Garden of Remembrance in the cemetery in Champagne-au-Mont-d'Or, near Lyon, France. Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images

To Counter Anti-Semitism, French Women Find Strength In Diversity At Auschwitz

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French president Emmanuel Macron takes part in a meeting in Évry-Courcouronnes on Feb. 4. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Will Macron's 'Great National Debate' Help Defuse France's Yellow Vest Unrest?

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Protesters take part in an antigovernment yellow vest demonstration in front of the Hôtel National des Invalides in Paris early in January. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

Migrants walk toward a snow-covered pass to cross the border from Italy to France, in January 2018 near Bardonecchia, Italian Alps. Piero Cruciatti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Piero Cruciatti/AFP/Getty Images

Rejected By Italy, Thousands Of Migrants From Africa Risk The Alps To Reach France

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