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Pia Klemp has refused to accept a medal for bravery from Paris' mayor, saying, "We do not need authorities deciding about who is a 'hero' and who is 'illegal.' " Tristar Media/Getty Images hide caption

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A cleanup crew scrubs pavement in front of the cathedral on Monday, after French inspectors said workers could return to the fire-damaged site to continue repairs. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

Notre Dame Repair Crews Are Back To Work, But Paris' Lead Concerns Remain

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Flying Frenchman Leapfrogs English Channel On His Homemade Hoverboard

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Students chip and chisel away at heavy slabs of stone in the workshops of the Hector Guimard high school, less than three miles from Paris' Notre Dame cathedral. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Notre Dame Fire Revives Demand For Skilled Stone Carvers In France

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France will levy a 3% tax on digital companies that make large profits in the country. French Economy and Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire, who championed the measure, is seen here on Wednesday in Paris. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

French Transport Minister Elisabeth Borne says a new tax on airfares "is a response to the ecological urgency and sense of injustice expressed by the French." She's seen here with Minister for the Ecological and Inclusive Transition Francois de Rugy. Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters

The U.S. will face its first major test in the Women's World Cup Thursday, as it plays Sweden in the final match of the group stage. U.S. forward Megan Rapinoe is seen here during the U.S. game against Thailand. Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. women stand for the national anthem ahead of an international friendly with Mexico late last month before heading to France for the FIFA Women's World Cup, which kicks off today. Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

U.S. World War II D-Day veteran Tom Rice, from Coronado, Calif., parachutes in a tandem jump into a field in Carentan, Normandy, France, on Wednesday. Approximately 200 parachutists participated in the event, replicating a jump made by U.S. soldiers on June 6, 1944 — D-Day. AP hide caption

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AP

France Won't Take ISIS Fighters Back, But Doesn't Want Them Executed Either

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Union members gather in front of a Paris courthouse on May 6, as several former senior employees of the then-named company France Télécom go on trial for alleged "moral harassment," a decade after a series of suicides occurred at the firm between 2008 and 2009. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

A Decade Ago, Suicides Rocked A French Telecom Firm. Now Its Execs Stand Trial

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French Culture Minister Françoise Nyssen (second right), Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo (center) and women's rights activists hold a banner reading "Maintenant on agit" ("Now we act"), on the eve of International Women's Day on March 7. They aim to raise funds to help women pursue justice, "so that no woman ever again has to say #MeToo." Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

In France, The #MeToo Movement Has Yet To Live Up To Women's Hopes

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