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The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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Alexei Navalny's YouTube show attracts a million views per episode. The Putin critic offers breezy commentary on the week's events, fields questions from his Twitter feed and heaps scorn on the Kremlin. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Banned From Russian TV, A Putin Critic Gets His Message Out On YouTube

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For Video Soundtracks, Computers Are The New Composers

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Actor Daniel Dae Kim attends a cocktail party celebrating dynamic and diverse nominees for the 67th Emmy Awards hosted by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and SAG-AFTRA at Montage Beverly Hills on Aug. 27, 2015, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

YouTube has changed the way it pays video creators. One says his earnings have recently "taken a huge nose dive." Danny Moloshok/AP hide caption

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Danny Moloshok/AP

Online Video Producers Caught In Struggle Between Advertisers And YouTube

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Social media postings showing parents "disciplining" their children, including (from left) LaToya Graham, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Tavis Sellers, went viral. ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR

Felix Kjellberg, better known as PewDiePie, signs copies of his book This Book Loves You at a Barnes & Noble in New York City in 2015. John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/Getty Images

Taylor Swift is one of many artists urging Congress to update copyright laws, which they argue don't fairly pay for music available online. Kevin Mazur/WireImage/Getty hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/WireImage/Getty

Why Taylor Swift Is Asking Congress To Update Copyright Laws

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Rachel Star Withers says that talking about her schizophrenia on YouTube has helped her. Some people who see the videos say the videos help them, too. Nii Ofoli Yartey/Courtesy of Rachel Star Withers hide caption

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Nii Ofoli Yartey/Courtesy of Rachel Star Withers

How YouTube Videos Help People Cope With Mental Illness

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Marvie, the host of Sesame Studios, will sing and answer viewer questions. Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Sesame Workshop

Beyond 'Sesame Street': A New Sesame Studios Channel On YouTube

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The characters of An African City (from left): Zainab, Ngozi, Nana Yaa, Sade and Makena. Emmanuel Bobbie/An African City Ltd. hide caption

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Emmanuel Bobbie/An African City Ltd.

Sex And 'An African City': A Steamy Ghanaian Show You Don't Want To Miss

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Rachel Star Withers says that video blogging about schizophrenia and depression has helped her manage the disorders. Courtesy of Rachel Star hide caption

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Courtesy of Rachel Star

Would You Tell The World You Have Schizophrenia On YouTube?

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

What Happens When The Price Of Free Goes Up? YouTube Is About To Find Out

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When Social Media Fuels Gang Violence

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