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The rain didn't stop customers from lining up outside Cultivate in Leicester, Mass., on Tuesday — the first day that sales of recreational marijuana became legal in the state. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at a rally for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jay Gonzalez (left) and congressional Democratic candidate Ayanna Pressley (second from left). Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Columbia Gas employee Brian Jones shines a flashlight so his partner, can shut off the gas in a home on Sept. 14, in Andover, Mass. On Tuesday, lawyers filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of thousands of residents impacted by last Thursday's gas explosions and fires triggered by a problem with a gas line that feeds homes in several communities north of Boston. Winslow Townson/AP hide caption

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Winslow Townson/AP

Massachusetts wanted to negotiate prices and stop the use of some of the most expensive drugs in its Medicaid program. The federal government said no. Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Nearly 90 former inmates are buried here on the grounds of the North Central Correctional Institution at Gardner. Before inmates, the state buried patients housed at what once was the Gardner State Colony for the "mentally disturbed." Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Tempering The Cost Of Aging, Dying In Prison With The Demands Of Justice

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Rep. Mike Capuano struggles to understand why some voters think race and gender are relevant in this race. When Capuano campaigns, he doesn't talk much about his opponent, focusing on his own record. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

The steel used to build lobster traps like these, stacked up outside a fish market on Martha's Vineyard, is getting pricier, thanks to new tariffs. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Got Lobster? Trump's Steel Tariffs Threaten Trap Industry

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Middlesex County Correctional Facility Assistant Deputy Superintendent Scott Chaput with inmates in the prison's P.A.C.T (People Achieving Change Together) unit in Billerica, Mass. Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

A New Approach To Incarceration In The U.S.: Responsibility

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Bystander video captured an incident in which police in Cambridge, Mass., are seen punching a black Harvard student who was naked in the median. Screengrab by NPR/Cambridge Police Department/YouTube hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/Cambridge Police Department/YouTube

Kate Murphy felt frustrated by a lack of advice from doctors on how to use medical marijuana to mitigate side effects from her cancer treatment. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In this February photo released by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, agents arrest foreign nationals. According to a Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruling Monday, local law enforcement cannot honor ICE "detainers," which request that a person remain in custody who would otherwise be released. Charles Reed/AP hide caption

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Charles Reed/AP

Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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Adrian Ventura is the director of Centro Comunitario de Trabajadores, or Community Workers Center, which was founded in the aftermath of the raid. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

10 Years After The New Bedford ICE Raid, Immigrant Community Has Hope

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Assistant Attorney General Kimberly Strovink, of Massachusetts Attorney General Healey's Civil Rights Division, answers calls coming into the state's hate hotline. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Massachusetts Hotline Tracks Post-Election Hate

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Nahant, Mass., is a rocky crescent-moon-shape piece of land that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean just north of Boston. In the era of climate change, residents are trying to figure out how to adapt to rising sea levels. Lucian Perkins for WBEZ hide caption

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Lucian Perkins for WBEZ

In Massachusetts, Coastal Residents Consider How To Adapt To Climate Change

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