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Nicole Maines, pictured at the GLAAD Media Awards in 2016, has been cast as the first transgender superhero on television. She will play Nia Nal on the CW's 'Supergirl.' Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

North Koreans watched a video screen in Pyongyang showing Korean Central Television news presenter Ri Chun Hee as she announced that the country had successfully tested a hydrogen bomb on Sept. 3, 2017. Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images

What Summit? On North Korean TV, The News Is All About Rice Farming

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Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF

This Is Your Brain On Ads: How Media Companies Hijack Your Attention

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"You can't solve the puzzle if I don't turn the letter," says Wheel of Fortune co-host Vanna White, 60. Peter Kramer/AP hide caption

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Peter Kramer/AP

Want To Buy A Vowel? Vanna White Looks Back On 35 Years At The 'Wheel'

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In 2007, members of "SixofOne" — a fan club of the television series The Prisoner — re-enacted the game of human chess from the episode "Checkmate," while the sinister Rover (center) looked on. Bruno Vincent/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Vincent/Getty Images

Number Six At 50: The 50th Anniversary Of 'The Prisoner'

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Isaac Hempstead Wright plays Bran Stark in the HBO adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones books. Some disability activists are concerned that Bran will be magically cured of his paralysis in the show's new season. Helen Sloan/HBO hide caption

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Helen Sloan/HBO

'Game Of Thrones' Finds Fans Among Disability Rights Activists, Too

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A barren, empty stretch of Scottish highlands, much like the one Eden's contestants made their lives in for a full year. Also, a reasonably accurate depiction of the show's audience these past few months (read: no one). Arterra/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Arterra/UIG via Getty Images

Colombian actor Andres Parra (left) plays Hugo Chavez in the new telenovela, El Comandante. Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures hide caption

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Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures

For Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, A Second Life On The Small Screen

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Film director Ava DuVernay brings her talents to "Queen Sugar," a drama series premiering Tuesday Sept. 6 on Oprah's OWN network. Paul A. Hebert/Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP hide caption

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Paul A. Hebert/Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP

Ava Duvernay And 'Queen Sugar': Celebrating Diversity, Inclusivity In TV

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Waad Qannam (left), 24, won a reality TV show called The President, in which the audience, instead of choosing its favorite singer, chose its favorite would-be leader. He is the closest Palestinians have come to electing a leader in more than a decade. Nick Schifrin/NPR hide caption

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Nick Schifrin/NPR

He's Not The Palestinian President, But He Played One On TV

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