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Spain's Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez steps out of the Moncloa Palace in Madrid, Tuesday. Since taking office on June 2, he has already put in motion a new, more liberal course after almost eight years of conservative leadership. Paul White/AP hide caption

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Paul White/AP

As Others Slam The Door, Spain's New Government Opens Arms To Migrant Ships

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Nick Shepherd/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The Edge Effect

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Demonstrators shout slogans Friday in Madrid, a day after a court ordered the release on bail of five men sentenced to nine years in prison for sexually abusing a young woman at Pamplona's bull-running festival. Javier Sorianoo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Javier Sorianoo/AFP/Getty Images

Migrants wait to disembark from the rescue ship Aquarius in the Sicilian harbor of Catania, Italy, on May 27. This past weekend the ship picked up more migrants, but was turned away from ports in Sicily and the nearby country of Malta. Now it will head for Spain instead. Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters hide caption

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Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters

The Aquarius, a former North Atlantic fisheries protection ship now used by humanitarian groups SOS Mediterranee and Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), is seen in December 2017 during a rescue operation in the Mediterranean Sea. The rescue ship was stranded this weekend after Italy and Malta refused to allow it to dock. Federico Scoppa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Scoppa/AFP/Getty Images

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (center) arrives for a vote on a no-confidence motion at the lower house of the Spanish parliament in Madrid on Friday. Pierre-Philippe Marcou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pierre-Philippe Marcou/AFP/Getty Images

Newly appointed Catalan leader Quim Torra (center) and other Catalan officials at Torra's ceremonial swearing-in on Thursday. Torra avoided promising to obey the constitution. Alberto Estévez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Estévez /AFP/Getty Images

People in the Spanish Basque village of Agurain walk past graffiti calling for the return of ETA prisoners to the Basque country on Thursday. The Basque separatist group has formally announced its dissolution. Ander Gillenea/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ander Gillenea/AFP/Getty Images

Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont — seen here in December in Brussels, where he is in exile — said Friday he no longer will pursue his bid for a second term in office. Jasper Juinen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Juinen/Getty Images

Left: Dirk Hoffmann and Alistair Pike sample calcite from a calcite crust on top of the red scalariform sign in La Pasiega.Right: Drawing of Panel 78 in La Pasiega by Breuil et al.(1913). The red scalariform (ladder) symbol has a minimum age of 64,000 years but it is unclear if the animals and other symbols were painted later. J. Zilhão (left) / Breuil et al. (1913)/Science Advances hide caption

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J. Zilhão (left) / Breuil et al. (1913)/Science Advances

Cave Art May Have Been Handiwork Of Neanderthals

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Demonstrators support former Catalan President Carles Puigdemont in front of the regional parliament in Barcelona on Tuesday. Puigdemont, who fled to Belgium to avoid arrest for leading a secession bid, is facing possible charges of rebellion, sedition and misuse of public funds and faces arrest if he returns from Brussels. Alex Caparros/Getty Images hide caption

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Catalan separatist leader Carles Puigdemont arrives at Copenhagen Airport in Denmark on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. On the same day, his name was put forth to return as Catalonia's president. Scanpix Denmark/Reuters hide caption

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Scanpix Denmark/Reuters

Ousted Catalan President Carles Puigdemont speaks at a press conference in Belgium last month, after a snap election in Catalonia gave pro-independence factions a slim majority in the regional parliament. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont (center) is seen in Belgium last month, where he has been living in exile since October. On Tuesday, a Spanish judge withdrew the international warrant for Puigdemont's arrest. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Catalan members of the Spanish parliament speak to the press outside Estremera prison, outside of Madrid, on Monday. A judge from Spain's Supreme Court granted bail to six imprisoned former members of the Catalan government, while two other politicians and two activists will remain in jail. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Thousands of people rally outside the regional presidential palace in Barcelona, protesting the arrest of Catalan politicians and pushing for Catalonia's independence, which was formally annulled in court Wednesday. The crowd is awash in Catalan independence flags and signs reading "free political prisoners." Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP