Spain Spain

Osama Abdul Mohsen holds his son Zaid as they arrive at the Barcelona train station on Sept. 16, 2015. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

After The Trip Seen 'Round The World, Syrian Refugee Builds A New Life

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Spain's Princess Cristina and husband, Inaki Urdangarin (right), leave a makeshift courtroom on Monday, the first day of a corruption trial. She is accused of tax fraud and is the first member of Spain's royal family to face criminal charges. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

Spain's Princess Goes On Trial

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Spanish hams hang from the ceiling at Museo del Jamón, a ham bar in downtown Madrid. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Spaniards Snap Up Holiday Hams, Even After Cancer Warning

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Ricardo Robleño Llorente and his wife, Laura Silva Kirkpatrick, show their college degrees at home in Madrid. Even though they have two bachelor's degrees and a master's between them, they were unable to find permanent work through most of their 20s, during Spain's economic crisis. "Why bother going to college at all?" Silva Kirkpatrick asks. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Spain's Economy Is Expanding, But Most New Jobs Are Temporary

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Demonstrators show support for Catalan independence during a protest last week in Barcelona. Spain's Constitutional Court has now ruled that a Nov. 9 declaration of independence by Catalan's regional parliament is unconstitutional. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

A solar tower belonging to the Spanish firm Abengoa is shown near Seville, in southern Spain, on Nov. 13. The large renewable energy company, which has been heavily subsidized by the government, is in danger of becoming the country's largest bankruptcy. The company also has a large solar facility in Arizona that has received U.S. government loan guarantees. Marcelo Del Pozo/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Marcelo Del Pozo/Reuters /Landov

Bankruptcy Looms For Spain's Green Energy Giant

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Junts Pel Si (Together for Yes) member of the Catalan Parliament Marta Rovira gives a thumbs up as she votes to pass the start of the independence process Monday in Barcelona, Spain. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

There was a lot of excitement in 2012, when the Hiriko car was unveiled at this event at European Union headquarters in Brussels. At the time, the then-president of the European Commission, Jose Manuel Barroso, hailed the car as a trans-Atlantic "exchange between the world of science and the world of business." Zhou Lei/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Zhou Lei/Xinhua/Landov

How A Folding Electric Vehicle Went From Car Of The Future To 'Obsolete'

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaking at a news conference in Spain. Kerry will attempt to strike the right balance in separate meetings later this week with Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

Osama Abdul Mohsen (left) has the promise of a new job in Spain, where soccer officials invited him to come live. He's seen here with his son Zaid as they arrive at the Barcelona train station Wednesday. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

Elderly residents gather in a dying village in the Sierra Francia region, northwest of Madrid. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

In Spain, Entire Villages Are Up For Sale — And They're Going Cheap

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A photo of Pablo Picasso's painting, Head of a Young Woman, released by French authorities on Tuesday. The painting was seized from a yacht on July 31 in Corsica, France. The painting belongs to a Spanish billionaire who was planning to sell it elsewhere in Europe. But Spanish authorities say it is a "national treasure" that can't be sent abroad without government permission. Douane Francaise via AP hide caption

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Douane Francaise via AP

A Picasso, A Yacht And A Dollop Of International Intrigue

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Archaeologists in Madrid study remains buried under the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians on Jan. 24. Tests proved the remains belonged to Miguel de Cervantes, the author of Don Quixote. Cervantes wanted to be buried at the convent because the nuns raised money and paid a ransom for his release when he was a young man held captive in North Africa. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

The Reason Cervantes Asked To Be Buried Under A Convent

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Pedro Barros Diéguez and Albina Macia Fernández, the husband-and-wife owners of Casa Pages, a traditional bar in Barcelona. Many of the city's historic, family-run businesses are in danger of closing because of rising rents, spurred by a huge spike in tourism Courtesy of Devour Barcelona hide caption

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Courtesy of Devour Barcelona

Barcelona's Mom-And-Pop Tapas Bars Take On The Big Tourist Chains

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