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Alejandro Gonzalez Raga and his wife, Bertha Bueno Fuentes, visit the U.N. Council of Human Rights in Geneva in 2013. After Gonzalez was imprisoned in Cuba for five years, the Catholic Church and Spanish government helped negotiate his release, into exile in Spain. His wife and children were allowed to accompany him, and the family currently has refugee status in Spain. Courtesy of Alejandro Gonzalez Raga hide caption

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Courtesy of Alejandro Gonzalez Raga

Pressing For Change In Cuba, From Exile In Spain

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Rita Bosaho, shown here in January, is the first black member elected to Spain's parliament. Born in Equatorial Guinea and raised in a foster family in Spain, she trained as a nurse before entering politics two years ago. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Spain's First Black Member Of Parliament And The 'New Politics'

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Ascensión Mendieta, 90, visits the mass grave where her father, Timoteo Mendieta, was buried in 1939. She saw him for the last time when she was 13. Two years ago, she became the plaintiff in a case to allow Spain's mass graves to be exhumed. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Finding A Long-Lost Father As Spain Exhumes Decades-Old Mass Graves

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Bankia's new repayment plan is geared toward thousands of small investors who were persuaded to convert their savings accounts into bank shares. Screengrab of Bankia video by NPR hide caption

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Screengrab of Bankia video by NPR

Podemos Party leader Pablo Iglesias (right) seen here with Spain's Socialist Party leader Pedro Sanchez, has asked for a referendum on Catalan independence as their two parties negotiate forming a new government. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

The Almudaina Palace (left) is one of two royal palaces on Spain's Mallorca island. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Spain's Playground For The Wealthy Becomes Corruption Scandal Epicenter

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Osama Abdul Mohsen holds his son Zaid as they arrive at the Barcelona train station on Sept. 16, 2015. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

After The Trip Seen 'Round The World, Syrian Refugee Builds A New Life

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Spain's Princess Cristina and husband, Inaki Urdangarin (right), leave a makeshift courtroom on Monday, the first day of a corruption trial. She is accused of tax fraud and is the first member of Spain's royal family to face criminal charges. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

Spain's Princess Goes On Trial

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Spanish hams hang from the ceiling at Museo del Jamón, a ham bar in downtown Madrid. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Spaniards Snap Up Holiday Hams, Even After Cancer Warning

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Ricardo Robleño Llorente and his wife, Laura Silva Kirkpatrick, show their college degrees at home in Madrid. Even though they have two bachelor's degrees and a master's between them, they were unable to find permanent work through most of their 20s, during Spain's economic crisis. "Why bother going to college at all?" Silva Kirkpatrick asks. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Spain's Economy Is Expanding, But Most New Jobs Are Temporary

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Demonstrators show support for Catalan independence during a protest last week in Barcelona. Spain's Constitutional Court has now ruled that a Nov. 9 declaration of independence by Catalan's regional parliament is unconstitutional. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

A solar tower belonging to the Spanish firm Abengoa is shown near Seville, in southern Spain, on Nov. 13. The large renewable energy company, which has been heavily subsidized by the government, is in danger of becoming the country's largest bankruptcy. The company also has a large solar facility in Arizona that has received U.S. government loan guarantees. Marcelo Del Pozo/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Marcelo Del Pozo/Reuters /Landov

Bankruptcy Looms For Spain's Green Energy Giant

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Junts Pel Si (Together for Yes) member of the Catalan Parliament Marta Rovira gives a thumbs up as she votes to pass the start of the independence process Monday in Barcelona, Spain. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

There was a lot of excitement in 2012, when the Hiriko car was unveiled at this event at European Union headquarters in Brussels. At the time, the then-president of the European Commission, Jose Manuel Barroso, hailed the car as a trans-Atlantic "exchange between the world of science and the world of business." Zhou Lei/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Zhou Lei/Xinhua/Landov

How A Folding Electric Vehicle Went From Car Of The Future To 'Obsolete'

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