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CIA Director Mike Pompeo speaks in Washington in January. The spy agency has become more open and active in recruiting staff, with the aim of greater diversity. Even Pompeo encourages job applications in his public remarks. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

CIA Recruiting: The Rare Topic The Spy Agency Likes To Talk About

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Deputy Director Gina Haspel joined the agency in 1985. President Trump tweeted this month that he would nominate CIA Director Mike Pompeo to be the new secretary of state and Haspel to replace him. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas reads from a placard during his meeting with the German Foreign Minister at the Palestinian presidential complex in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Jan. 31. Atef Safadi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atef Safadi/AFP/Getty Images

Defense lawyer Walter Ruiz represents Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, one of the detainees accused of orchestrating the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A seal at the CIA headquarters, photographed in February 2016. The alleged CIA documents reveal a hacking program that is very different from the one uncovered by Edward Snowden's NSA leak. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

The Central Intelligence Agency logo is seen at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Va., in 2016. In a statement accompanying the document release, WikiLeaks alleges that the CIA has recently "lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Italian President Sergio Mattarella granted partial clemency to former CIA officer Sabrina De Sousa, who was convicted in absentia of taking part in a 2003 kidnapping in Milan as part of a CIA detention and interrogation program. Vicenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vicenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images

Shahram Amiri, an Iranian nuclear scientist, attends a news briefing while holding his son Amir Hossein as he arrives at the Imam Khomeini airport just outside Tehran, Iran, after returning from the United States in 2010. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP