Cold War Cold War

Tanks parade past President Trump, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte Macron, during a Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris on July 14, 2017. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Wants Pentagon To Stage Military Parade Down Pennsylvania Avenue

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A Hawaii Civil Defense Warning Device, which sounds an alert siren during natural disasters, is shown in Honolulu on Nov. 29, 2017. The alert system is tested monthly, but now Hawaii residents will hear a new tone designed to alert people of an impending nuclear attack by North Korea. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

Nuclear Strike Drills Faded Away In The 1980s. It May Be Time To Dust Them Off

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Indonesian soldiers stand guard over members of the youth wing of the Indonesian Communist Party, who were packed into a truck to be taken to a Jakarta prison in October 1965. Over the next few months, the government's military leadership carried out the systematic execution of hundreds of thousands of people. /AP hide caption

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/AP

Fallout shelter signs, like this one, still hang on buildings around the U.S. Travis S./Flickr hide caption

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Travis S./Flickr

As Rhetoric Ramps Up, Are Today's Kids Worried About Nuclear War?

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The Cheyenne Mountain Complex was completed in the mid-1960s. The tunnels extend thousands of feet into Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado Springs, Colo. Courtesy Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Courtesy Simon & Schuster

In The Event Of Attack, Here's How The Government Plans 'To Save Itself'

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A United Nations propaganda poster from the Korean War era bears an anti-communist message. In South Korea, the propaganda turned North Koreans into beast-like characters. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Why Do Some South Koreans Believe A Myth That North Koreans Have Horns?

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Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

This undated photo released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Nov. 11 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un at a defense detachment on Mahap Islet. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KNS/AFP/Getty Images

How Uncertainty In The Korean Peninsula Could Be A 'Recipe for Disaster'

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Pez Owen was joyriding in her Cessna airplane when she first spotted a giant X etched in the desert. "It's not on the [flight] chart. There just wasn't any indication of this huge cross," she says. Chuck Penson/Pez Owen hide caption

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Chuck Penson/Pez Owen

Decades-Old Mystery Put To Rest: Why Are There X's In The Desert?

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A tourist at the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, New Mexico, in February examines a full-size replica of the "Fat Man" atomic bomb which was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on Aug. 9, 1945. Los Alamos is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory which was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

Nancy Reagan (left) and Soviet first lady Raisa Gorbachev both smile politely during a tension-filled tea in Geneva in 1985, while their husbands discussed nuclear disarmament. Dieter Endlicher/AP hide caption

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Dieter Endlicher/AP