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Wendy Vitter, with her husband, David Vitter, after he was reelected to the Senate in 2010 despite being linked to the "D.C. Madam" scandal. Wendy Vitter is now nominated for a judgeship. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Judicial Nominee Wendy Vitter Gets Tough Questions On Birth Control And Abortion

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For the Bean Madness competition, decisions on this classic dish can turn on preferences set long ago by family tradition, house style and even generational differences. sandoclr/Getty Images hide caption

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sandoclr/Getty Images

'We Cannot Be Afraid Of The Truth': New Orleans Mayor On Confederate Statues

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Francis Brauner was instrumental in helping launch a class-action lawsuit on behalf of current inmates at Louisiana's Angola prison, suing for care that allegedly caused them "needless pain and suffering." Charles A. Smith hide caption

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Charles A. Smith

Angola Prison Lawsuit Poses Question: What Kind Of Medical Care Do Inmates Deserve?

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During the 2017 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival last April, Mr. Okra drove his iconic produce truck and called out to customers. Erika Goldring/Getty Images hide caption

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Erika Goldring/Getty Images

Listen to Mr. Okra’s Call

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Dancers perform in Tabasco: A Burlesque Opera, a fiery show that makes its revival this week after being locked up for more than a century. Tom Grosscup/New Orleans Opera hide caption

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Tom Grosscup/New Orleans Opera

'Tabasco' Opera Makes Fiery Return In New Orleans

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Betsy's Pancake House on Canal Street in New Orleans announces its return to business after Hurricane Katrina. Ian McNulty hide caption

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Ian McNulty

Dr. Ruth Berggren stands outside Charity Hospital in New Orleans in 2005, where she had earlier cared for patients during Hurricane Katrina. Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP

John Livious started over in Houston after being evacuated from New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Now, flooding has forced him to leave this new city. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

He Survived Hurricane Katrina. Now He's Had To Leave Houston

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Dwayne Boudreaux Jr., owner of the Circle Food Store in New Orleans, dumps out dirty water that was vacuumed up from the store on Monday, after severe flooding over the weekend. The city's pumps were not fully functional, officials now acknowledge. Boudreaux told a local news station that the last time he saw waters rise so high was during Hurricane Katrina. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Nicole Boykins is principal at Crocker College Prep in New Orleans. The pre-K through eighth grade school is one of five schools in a program to better serve children who've been exposed to trauma. Clarence Williams/WWNO hide caption

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Clarence Williams/WWNO

When Schools Meet Trauma With Understanding, Not Discipline

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A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is removed Friday from Lee Circle in New Orleans. Lee's was the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed under a 2015 City Council vote on a proposal by Mayor Mitch Landrieu. Scott Threlkeld/AP hide caption

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Scott Threlkeld/AP

A statue to Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard is the third post-Civil War monument to come down in New Orleans. The bronze statue was taken down from its previous spot at the entrance to City Park just after 3 a.m. local time Wednesday. Scott Threlkeld/AP hide caption

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Scott Threlkeld/AP

The statue of Jefferson Davis is removed from its base in New Orleans as police officers stand watch early Thursday. Demonstrators both for and against the removal of Confederate-era statues had gathered at the site. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

As they travel the parade route, tuxedoed men and youths distribute strings of colorful beads, dried fava beans and genuine Italian kisses. Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society hide caption

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Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society