NFL NFL

Hannah Storm (shown here) and Andrea Kremer are Amazon Prime Video's sportscasting team and are set to call 11 NFL games this season. Taylor Hill/Getty Images for ESPN hide caption

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Taylor Hill/Getty Images for ESPN

Hannah Storm, Part Of First All-Women NFL Broadcast Team, Is Set For Kickoff

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Andrea Kremer (left) and Hannah Storm will be the first all-female broadcast team to announce an NFL game, covering Thursday night's game for Amazon Prime Video. Brian Ach/AP for Amazon hide caption

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Brian Ach/AP for Amazon

Cleveland Browns wide receiver Jarvis Landry celebrates as the Browns seal their first win since December 2016. On Thursday night, Landry had more than 100 yards receiving — and he threw a two-point conversion pass to quarterback Baker Mayfield. David Richard/AP hide caption

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David Richard/AP

Eli Harold, Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid of the San Francisco 49ers kneel in protest during the national anthem prior to their NFL game on Oct. 6, 2016. Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images hide caption

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Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

Miami Dolphins players kneel during the national anthem before their game against the Carolina Panthers at Bank of America Stadium on Nov. 13, 2017, in Charlotte, N.C. Grant Halverson/Getty Images hide caption

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Grant Halverson/Getty Images

President Trump stands, with his hand over his heart, on the field for the national anthem before the start of the NCAA National Championship football game in January. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Washington's football team is facing allegations from its cheerleaders about the way they were treated on a 2013 trip to Costa Rica. Here, the squad warms up before an NFL preseason game in 2014. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Washington's NFL Cheerleaders Say They Had To Pose Topless As VIPs Watched

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Manchester United players warm up in London's Wembley Stadium prior the FA Cup semifinal match against Tottenham Hotspur on Saturday. American billionaire Shahid Khan has made a bid to buy the stadium. Catherine Ivill/Getty Images hide caption

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Catherine Ivill/Getty Images

Bailey Davis, a former cheerleader for the New Orleans Saints, appears on Megyn Kelly TODAY on March 28. Davis was fired from the Saintsations after posting a photo of herself wearing a one-piece bodysuit on her private Instagram account. Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

An NFL Cheerleader Brings Her Firing Over An Instagram Photo To The EEOC

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Indianapolis Colts football player Edwin Jackson in a photo from earlier this year. Jackson, 26, was one of two men killed when a suspected drunken driver struck them as they stood outside their car along a highway in Indianapolis. AP hide caption

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AP

Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Elsa/Getty Images

Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

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ESPN columnist Jemele Hill attends ESPN The Party on Feb. 5, 2016 in San Francisco. Robin Marchant/Getty Images hide caption

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Robin Marchant/Getty Images

ESPN's Jemele Hill On Race, Football And That Tweet About Trump

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The New Orleans Saints kneel before the playing of the national anthem before the game against the Green Bay Packers at Lambeau Field on Oct. 22. Dylan Buell/Getty Images hide caption

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Dylan Buell/Getty Images

Louisiana Lawmaker Threatens Saints' Tax Breaks After Anthem Protests

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Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson watches the action during the first half of an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Green Bay Packers in Charlotte, N.C., on Sunday. Mike McCarn/AP hide caption

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Mike McCarn/AP