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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday on whether a state has to adhere to the Eighth Amendment's excessive fines clause. That could have consequences for civil forfeiture in crimes. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Appears Ready To Make It Harder For States To Confiscate Property

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Cheese sculptor Sarah Kaufmann poses with her masterpiece, depicting "Great Dairy Moo-ments in Cheese History" on display at this year's Indiana State Fair. It weighs in at almost half a ton. Courtesy of Allison Pareis hide caption

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Courtesy of Allison Pareis

'You Never Know Where Cheese Takes You': Dairy Sculptor Savors The Moo-ments

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The Surgeon General recommends more Americans carry naloxone, the opioid overdose antidote. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Reversing An Overdose Isn't Complicated, But Getting The Antidote Can Be

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Katiena Johnson stands with her daughter Destini, who was released from jail in August. Katiena and her husband, Roger, took care of their grandchildren while Destini was struggling through her addiction. Destini, 27, recently regained consciousness after suffering a dozen or so strokes as a result of her latest opioid overdose. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Anguished Families Shoulder The Biggest Burdens Of Opioid Addiction

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Samples of blood and other bodily fluids at the coroner's office in Marion County, Ind., are tested for controlled substances. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced federal approval for changes to Indiana's Medicaid program Friday in Indianapolis. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Then-Gov. Mike Pence announced in 2015 that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services had approved Indiana's waiver to experiment with Medicaid requirements. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

A photo provided by the Indiana State Police shows the wreckage from a small plane crash Saturday night in southeastern Indiana. An executive at the NTSB was among the three people killed when the Cessna crashed into the woods. Indiana State Police/AP hide caption

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Indiana State Police/AP

Controversy has erupted in Carmel, Ind., as the city council is expected to consider $76 million in new bonds to pay for various projects, including one for a new luxury hotel, a couple new roundabouts and, this antique carousel. Arlan Ettinger/Guernsey's hide caption

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Arlan Ettinger/Guernsey's

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court and gay rights advocates. Indiana teacher Kimberly Hively, shown here in 2015, filed a lawsuit alleging that Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. Lambda Legal/AP hide caption

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Lambda Legal/AP

Green shoots of cereal rye, a popular cover crop, emerge in a field where corn was recently harvested in Iowa. The grass will go dormant in winter, then resume growing in the spring. Less than three percent of corn fields in the state have cover crops. Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa hide caption

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Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa

Then-Indiana Gov. Mike Pence announces that the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services has approved the state's waiver request for its Medicaid plan in 2015. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

As Indiana Governor, Mike Pence announced in 2015 that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services approved a waiver for the state's Medicaid experiment. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

It's been a few weeks since President-elect Donald Trump celebrated Indiana's Carrier company's decision to keep some factory jobs from moving to Mexico. Other manufacturers are wondering what the deal might mean for them. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Carrier Got Cut A Deal, But Can Other Companies Expect The Same?

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Kara Salim, 26, got out of the Marion County, Indiana, jail in 2015 with a history of domestic-violence charges, bipolar disorder and alcoholism — and without Medicaid coverage. As a result, she couldn't afford the fees for court-ordered therapy. Philip Scott Andrews for KHN hide caption

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Philip Scott Andrews for KHN

Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

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