North Korea North Korea

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un stand and wave in an open-air Mercedes-Benz as thousands of people welcome their motorcade in Pyongyang. Pyongyang Press Corps/Pool/Reuters hide caption

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Pyongyang Press Corps/Pool/Reuters

Kim Hosts South Korea's Moon For Summit Talks In Pyongyang

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A man walks past a giant banner showing a picture of the summit handshake between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at Seoul City Hall on Sept, 13. Moon will fly to North Korea's capital on Sept. 18 for a third summit with Kim. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (left) poses with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in April at the border village of Panmunjom. Korea Summit Press Pool via AP hide caption

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Korea Summit Press Pool via AP

Is 'Training' A 'War Game?' The Answer Could Determine U.S.-South Korea Exercises

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Ham Sung-chan, 93, (right) of South Korea hugs his North Korean brother Ham Dong Chan, 79, during a family reunion meeting at the Mount Kumgang resort on the North's southeastern coast. Korea Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Korea Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Ahn Seung-choon was 14 when her 17-year-old brother was taken away from the family home in Pyeongchang. "After that day, we didn't hear anything about him," Ahn says. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

South Koreans Prepare For Rare Family Reunions With Long-Lost Relatives In The North

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North Korea and South Korea will hold their third high-level summit in September. The meetings were agreed to at a meeting of South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-Gyon, second from right, who shook hands with his North Korean counterpart Ri Son Gwon, second from left, after their meeting in Panmunjom. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

2 Koreas' Leaders Will Hold New Summit In Pyongyang Next Month

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National security adviser John Bolton, center, and President Trump's chief of staff John Kelly, right, attend a Cabinet meeting in the White House, Tuesday, last month. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The single dog tag in the 55 boxes of human remains turned over to the U.S. by North Korea last week was still readable. It was presented to Master Sgt. Charles Hobert McDaniel's two sons at a ceremony on Wednesday. Jay Price /Member station WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price /Member station WUNC

Military members carry transfer cases from a C-17 at a ceremony marking the arrival of the remains believed to be of American service members who fell in the Korean War at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Hawaii, on Wednesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

This July 22 satellite image, released and annotated by 38 North on Monday, shows what the U.S. research group says is the partial dismantling of the rail-mounted transfer structure (center) at the Sohae launch site in North Korea. Airbus Defense & Space/38 North via AP hide caption

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Airbus Defense & Space/38 North via AP

A U.N. honor guard at Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, carries a box containing remains believed to be from American servicemen killed during the Korean War after they arrived from North Korea on Friday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

North Korean viewers watch a giant television screen outside the central railway station in Pyongyang, which was broadcasting news of the Singapore summit last month between Kim Jong Un and President Trump. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Journalists set up in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building on Monday in anticipation of President Trump's announcing his next Supreme Court nomination Monday evening. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

A photo taken in February 2017 and released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) shows the launch of the solid-fuel medium long-range ballistic missile Pukguksong-2 at an undisclosed location. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

The portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung (left) and Kim Jong Il are displayed in Kim Il Sung square in central Pyongyang. A succession of rulers have held talks with U.S. officials. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Zainab Chaudry (from left), Zainab Arain and Megan Fair with the Council on American-Islamic Relations stand outside the Supreme Court for a rally against the Trump travel ban before oral arguments. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

In Big Win For White House, Supreme Court Upholds President Trump's Travel Ban

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