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Han Seohee (right) and fellow North Korean defectors Lee Gwang-sung (left) and Hwang Soyeon (center) are regulars on Moranbong Club, a South Korean talk show featuring North Korean defectors. "There's a lot of prejudice toward North Korean defectors in South Korea," Han says. "So I wanted to show South Koreans that we're living here and trying the best we can." Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

South Korea's Newest TV Stars Are North Korean Defectors

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A uniformed tour guide gestures to tourists outside the War Museum in Pyongyang. U.S. citizens can visit North Korea as tourists. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Claims It Has U.S. Student In Custody

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A South Korean soldier stands next to loudspeakers near the border with North Korea on Jan. 8. South Korea responded to the North's latest nuclear test by resuming the broadcasts that include news, criticism of the North Korean regime and pop music. Lim Tae-hoon/AP hide caption

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Lim Tae-hoon/AP

Responding To Nuclear Test, S. Korea Cranks Up The K-Pop

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Young South Koreans in the Hongdae neighborhood of Seoul, the weekend following North Korea's latest announcement of a nuclear test. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

For Young South Koreans, The North's Nuclear Test Is Barely A Blip

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A US B-52 Stratofortress is escorted by a South Korean fighter jet (left) and a U.S. fighter jet (right) as it flies over the Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, on Sunday. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

A South Korean soldier looks through a pair of binoculars near the village of Panmunjom, which sits at the border between the two Koreas. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

South Korea To Resume Broadcasting Propaganda To The North Over Loudspeakers

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Castle Romeo was an American hydrogen bomb test in March 1954 at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. It was 11 megatons, or roughly 1,000 times more powerful than North Korea's test on Wednesday. North Korea says it was a hydrogen bomb test, though the White House says it doubts the claim. Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

The U.S. Isn't Buying North Korea's Claim Of An H-Bomb Test

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves during a parade in Pyongyang, North Korea, in October. The country said it carried a successful hydrogen bomb text on Wednesday morning, but many analysts are skeptical. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

South Koreans watch a report on North Korea's TV announcement that it had successfully conducted a hydrogen bomb test. North Korea's neighbors have condemned the nuclear test, which is still being verified. Jeon Heon-Kyun/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jeon Heon-Kyun/EPA/Landov

U.S. and South Korean soldiers of the combined 2nd Infantry Division train at Camp Red Cloud in Uijeongbu, South Korea. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

For South Korea-U.S. Summit, The Big Question Is Still North Korea

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