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U.S. reconnaissance images show a North Korean ship, the Rye Song Gang 1, conducting a ship-to-ship transfer, possibly of oil, in an effort to evade sanctions on Oct. 19. South Korea has seized a ship it suspects of participating in such transfers. U.S. Treasury Department hide caption

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U.S. Treasury Department

A photo released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 15 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacting during a test launch of a ballistic rocket. Reuters has identified the man at Kim's right, with one hand on the table, as Ri Pyong Chol, and the man immediately behind Kim, looking toward the side, as Kim Jong Sik. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

John Coster-Mullen Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

North Korea Designed A Nuke. So Did This Truck Driver

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U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley on Friday votes in favor of a U.N. Security Council resolution calling for new sanctions against North Korea, including sharply lower limits on its refined oil imports, the return home of all North Koreans working overseas within 12 months and a crackdown on the country's shipping. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

A Hawaii Civil Defense Warning Device, which sounds an alert siren during natural disasters, is shown in Honolulu on Nov. 29, 2017. The alert system is tested monthly, but now Hawaii residents will hear a new tone designed to alert people of an impending nuclear attack by North Korea. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

Nuclear Strike Drills Faded Away In The 1980s. It May Be Time To Dust Them Off

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told a think-tank audience on Tuesday the U.S. shouldn't require North Korea to promise to give up its nuclear weapons as a condition of holding talks between the two countries. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

A man gets out of a Volvo 144 to head to a parade in Pyongyang in 2012. In the 1970s, North Korea ordered 1,000 Volvo 144s from Sweden. To this day, the cars have not been paid for. Tanya L. Procyshyn hide caption

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Tanya L. Procyshyn

How 1,000 Volvos Ended Up In North Korea — And Made A Diplomatic Difference

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Kim Jong Nam had been critical of North Korea's dynastic rule. Kim Jong Un, who inherited the leadership in 2011, was believed to have issued a standing order for his brother's execution. Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

People at the Pyongyang Train Station in North Korea cheer as they watch the news broadcast announcing leader Kim Jong Un's order to test-fire the newly developed inter-continental ballistic missile Hwasong-15. Jon Chol Jin/AP hide caption

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Jon Chol Jin/AP