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North Korean defector Shin Dong-hyuk came to prominence in a 2012 book about his life in a North Korean prisoner camp. He now says some key parts of his story were not true. His case highlights the difficulty in confirming information in a closed society like North Korea. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Amid much speculation by private security analysts, the FBI stood by its claim this week that North Korea was responsible for the hack against Sony Pictures. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

People watch a TV news program showing Kim Yo Jong, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's younger sister, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, in November. She has reportedly married the son of the ruling party secretary. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

The Interview is now Sony's top online movie. It earned $15 million through rentals and sales, the studio said. It pulled in almost another $3 million from theater screenings. Jim Ruymen/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Jim Ruymen/UPI/Landov

The toxic ingredients of a cyberattack like the one North Korea is accused of unleashing on Sony Pictures are available in underground markets. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Sony Hack Highlights The Global Underground Market For Malware

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The Alamo Drafthouse theater chain will show The Interview starting on Christmas Day. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

In Its Strange Journey, 'The Interview' Becomes An Art House Film

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A poster for The Interview. Some theaters now say they will show the comedy, which Sony Pictures had pulled following threats. Jim Ruymen/UPI /Landov hide caption

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Jim Ruymen/UPI /Landov