North Korea North Korea

Samantha Power, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, says the proposed resolution sanctioning North Korea "is the toughest sanctions resolution that has been put forward in more than two decades." Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

U.S. Proposes Tough New Sanctions On North Korea — With China's Support

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Visitors look at the military wire fences at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, South Korea, on Feb. 14. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Breaking The North Korean Information Blockade

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North Korean employees work at the assembly line of a South Korean company at the Kaesong Industrial Complex. South Korea announced Wednesday it is shutting down the industrial park, following North Korea's recent nuclear test and rocket launch. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

People watch a television screen showing breaking news on North Korea's long-range rocket launch on Sunday in Seoul, South Korea. Western experts consider the launch to be part of a program to develop intercontinental ballistic missile technologies, banned by multiple U. N. Security Council resolutions against North Korea. Han Myung-Gu/Getty Images hide caption

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Han Myung-Gu/Getty Images

People watch a news report at a railway station in Seoul on Feb. 3. North Korea launched a long-range rocket Sunday local time, defying international criticism. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

The North Korea Information Center in Seoul, South Korea, holds a vast collection of publications, videos and everyday items from the North. Here, North Korea Woman magazine features the classic propaganda art often seen in North Korea. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In The Heart Of Seoul, A Trove Of North Korean Propaganda

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Han Seohee (right) and fellow North Korean defectors Lee Gwang-sung (left) and Hwang Soyeon (center) are regulars on Moranbong Club, a South Korean talk show featuring North Korean defectors. "There's a lot of prejudice toward North Korean defectors in South Korea," Han says. "So I wanted to show South Koreans that we're living here and trying the best we can." Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

South Korea's Newest TV Stars Are North Korean Defectors

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A uniformed tour guide gestures to tourists outside the War Museum in Pyongyang. U.S. citizens can visit North Korea as tourists. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Claims It Has U.S. Student In Custody

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A South Korean soldier stands next to loudspeakers near the border with North Korea on Jan. 8. South Korea responded to the North's latest nuclear test by resuming the broadcasts that include news, criticism of the North Korean regime and pop music. Lim Tae-hoon/AP hide caption

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Lim Tae-hoon/AP

Responding To Nuclear Test, S. Korea Cranks Up The K-Pop

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Young South Koreans in the Hongdae neighborhood of Seoul, the weekend following North Korea's latest announcement of a nuclear test. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

For Young South Koreans, The North's Nuclear Test Is Barely A Blip

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A US B-52 Stratofortress is escorted by a South Korean fighter jet (left) and a U.S. fighter jet (right) as it flies over the Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, on Sunday. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

A South Korean soldier looks through a pair of binoculars near the village of Panmunjom, which sits at the border between the two Koreas. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

South Korea To Resume Broadcasting Propaganda To The North Over Loudspeakers

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