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This undated picture released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (C) inspecting a catfish farm at an undisclosed location in North Korea. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KNS/AFP/Getty Images

Joking About A North Korean Cooking Show Just Isn't Funny

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Shin Eun-mi was deported by immigration authorities in South Korea following an investigation that she broke the National Security Act. Shin Joon-hee/AP via Yonhap hide caption

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Shin Joon-hee/AP via Yonhap

The North Korea Threat Keeps A Cold-War Era Security Law Around

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South Korean people watch a television broadcast at the Seoul Railway Station earlier this month reporting North Korea's surface-to-air missile launch. Woohae Cho/Getty Images hide caption

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Woohae Cho/Getty Images

A South Korean army soldier walks by a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with superimposed letters that read: "North Korea's nuclear warhead." The warhead was later jokingly dubbed "the disco bomb." Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

An undated picture provided by the official Korean Central News Agency earlier this month shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un talking with scientists and technicians. North Korea's nuclear warhead was jokingly dubbed "the disco ball," but experts say the spherical device, while likely a model, is probably based on a real nuclear weapons design. KCNA/EPA via Corbis hide caption

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KCNA/EPA via Corbis

Why Analysts Aren't Laughing At These Silly North Korean Photos

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American student Otto Warmbier is escorted at the Supreme Court in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Wednesday. He was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for subversion after he allegedly stole a propaganda poster. Jon Chol Jin/AP hide caption

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Jon Chol Jin/AP

China's U.N. Ambassador Liu Jieyi speaks with U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power before the Security Council vote on sanctions against North Korea on March 2. Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images

Why China Supports New Sanctions Against North Korea

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Otto Frederick Warmbier, a 21-year-old American student, speaks during a news conference in Pyongyang on Feb. 29. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

A U.S. soldier stands on an armored vehicle during an annual exercise Monday in Yeoncheon, South Korea, near the border with North Korea. Pyongyang threatened a "preemptive nuclear strike of justice" in retaliation for the joint training exercises. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

At U.N. headquarters in New York on Wednesday, the Security Council approved a resolution that diplomats say would impose the toughest sanctions on North Korea in two decades. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP