North Korea North Korea

Visitors look at the China-North Korea Friendship Bridge across the Yalu River from Dandong, in northeast China. A company operating from Dandong is under fresh sanctions by the U.S. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Targets Chinese Company For Supporting N. Korean Nuclear Program

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Kim Chol Ho, deputy manager of the Rajin port, in North Korea's Rason Special Economic Zone, looks out at small fishing boats. Despite stepped-up international sanctions, North Korea is still trading extensively with China. Eric Talmadge/AP hide caption

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Eric Talmadge/AP

The 'Livelihood Loophole' And Other Weaknesses Of N. Korea Sanctions

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A Chinese flag flies on a boat next to the bridge that spans the Yalu River linking the North Korean town of Sinuiju with the Chinese town of Dandong. Most of North Korea's trade is with China, and much of it crosses the border here. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Japan meteorological agency officer Gen Aoki displays seismic readings that are apparently a result of a nuclear weapons test in North Korea on Friday morning. North Korea later confirmed it had conducted its fifth nuclear test. Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Conducts Its 5th Test Of Nuclear Weapon

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North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency. North Korea and Laos have had good relations for many years, but South Korea is trying to make inroads as well. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Laos: A Remote Battleground For North And South Korea

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North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, don't just serve North Korean cuisine. They are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency to send back to an increasingly sanctioned Pyongyang. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

The U.S. and South Korea kicked off annual military exercises Monday, prompting threats of a nuclear strike from North Korea amid high tensions on the peninsula. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP