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North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un listens during a meeting in February with President Trump at the second U.S.-North Korea summit in Hanoi. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A forest fire is seen raging near buildings in Sokcho, South Korea. South Korea mobilized troops and helicopters to deal with the massive blaze that roared through forests and cities along the eastern coast. Kangwon Ilbo via Getty Images hide caption

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Kangwon Ilbo via Getty Images

Protesters hold a banner showing images, of President Trump, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and National Security Adviser John Bolton during a rally against U.S. sanctions on North Korea, near the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha (right) shakes hands with Timothy Betts, acting Deputy Assistant Secretary and Senior Advisor for Security Negotiations and Agreements in the U.S. Department of State (left) during their meeting on Feb. 10. Lee Jin-Man/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Jin-Man/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. And South Korea Reach Deal On Military Costs

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Shim Suk-hee (front left) races during the women's 1,500-meter finals at a World Cup short track speedskating event at the Utah Olympic Oval on Nov. 13, 2016, in Kearns, Utah. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

South Korea Will Interview Thousands Of Athletes After Rape And Abuse Allegations

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South Korean journalist and former North Korean defector Kim Myong Song speaks at a cafe in Seoul. The government's decision to ban him from covering an inter-Korean meeting raised concerns about press freedom. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

For A North Korean Defector Turned Journalist, Warming Ties Are Cause For Worry

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The interior of the DMZ train, a three-car tourist train. It is decorated with words such as "love," "peace" and "harmony," in several languages. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

South Korea Sends 1st Train In Plan To Reconnect With North

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Some 70,000 women in August gathered in central Seoul, holding signs saying, "My life is not your porn." It was the fourth protest this year condemning the prevalence of hidden-camera crimes. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

South Korean Women Fight Back Against Spy Cams In Public Bathrooms

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South Korean President Moon Jae-in, first lady Kim Jung-sook, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his wife Ri Sol Ju pose for beside the Heaven Lake of Mount Paektu, North Korea, Sept. 20. Pyeongyang Press Corps/Reuters hide caption

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Pyeongyang Press Corps/Reuters

South Korean President Moon Jae-in (left) and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un shake hands after signing a joint declaration at the Paekhwawon State Guesthouse in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Wednesday. Pyongyang Press Corps Pool via AP hide caption

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Pyongyang Press Corps Pool via AP

North Korea's Kim Jong Un Says He Will Visit Seoul

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A man walks past a giant banner showing a picture of the summit handshake between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at Seoul City Hall on Sept, 13. Moon will fly to North Korea's capital on Sept. 18 for a third summit with Kim. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Is 'Training' A 'War Game?' The Answer Could Determine U.S.-South Korea Exercises

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Ham Sung-chan, 93, (right) of South Korea hugs his North Korean brother Ham Dong Chan, 79, during a family reunion meeting at the Mount Kumgang resort on the North's southeastern coast. Korea Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Korea Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Ahn Seung-choon was 14 when her 17-year-old brother was taken away from the family home in Pyeongchang. "After that day, we didn't hear anything about him," Ahn says. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

South Koreans Prepare For Rare Family Reunions With Long-Lost Relatives In The North

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North Korea and South Korea will hold their third high-level summit in September. The meetings were agreed to at a meeting of South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-Gyon, second from right, who shook hands with his North Korean counterpart Ri Son Gwon, second from left, after their meeting in Panmunjom. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

2 Koreas' Leaders Will Hold New Summit In Pyongyang Next Month

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North Korean viewers watch a giant television screen outside the central railway station in Pyongyang, which was broadcasting news of the Singapore summit last month between Kim Jong Un and President Trump. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images