South Korea South Korea

Kim Yong Nam, top left, president of the Presidium of North Korean Parliament, and Kim Yo Jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, top right, sit behind U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, bottom left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, bottom right, as they watch the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Sarah Murray, center, head coach of the unified Korean women's ice hockey team, says the team has come together since being formed through a political dialogue. Here, Murray and the South Korean players (in black) welcomed North Korea's coach Pak Chol-Ho and members of the northern team last month. The united team now wears all-white coats. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

Soohorang (left) the mascot of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, and Bandabi, mascot of the Paralympics, welcome visitors to the Alpensia Resort in Pyeongchang, one of many facilities that has been reworked for the games. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Chappell/NPR

The United States team walks in the Parade of Athletes during the Winter Olympics opening ceremony on Friday. The team has more athletes than any nation at the Games and it's the most diverse of any U.S. winter squad, in terms of both race and gender. There are 108 women on the team, more than any other U.S. Winter Olympics team in the past. Quinn Rooney/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

Vice President Pence is greeted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo on Wednesday. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

Pence Starts Asia Trip Amid Signs Of Strain With South Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583967874/584060031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Korean soldiers walk past a security checkpoint Tuesday in Pyeongchang, where they have been replacing security guards who showed symptoms of the norovirus. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Every ad in the Seoul Metro's Apujeong station is for a plastic surgery clinic. In response to a growing number of complaints from riders, the Seoul Metro announced it will ban advertisements for cosmetic surgery at its stations. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

Vice President Pence addresses a dinner earlier this year in White Sulphur Springs, W.V. Pence is heading to South Korea for diplomatic efforts and Olympic events. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium cost roughly $109 million to build for South Korea's 2018 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. The stadium will be used just four times before being demolished. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

President Trump's State of the Union address is broadcast at a railway station in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday. The White House is no longer considering Victor Cha for the South Korea ambassadorship. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Jin-man/AP

Rescue workers remove a survivor from a hospital fire on Friday in Miryang, South Korea. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout/Getty Images

Fire Rips Through South Korean Hospital, Killing Dozens Of Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/580926197/580933946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bob Chicca points to the spot on the deck of the USS Pueblo where he was wounded by a 57 mm shell during the attack on the ship by North Korea. David Welna/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Welna/NPR

Remembering North Korea's Audacious Capture Of The USS Pueblo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/580076540/580076541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Korean protesters burn a portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in front of Seoul Station on Monday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

In South Korea, A Backlash Against Olympics Cooperation With The North

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/579668339/579787752" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With North Korea planning to participate in the 2018 Winter Olympics, delegation head Jon Jong Su, vice chairman of the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the Country, crosses the concrete border to attend a meeting at the truce village of Panmunjom in the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. Yonhap via Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Yonhap via Reuters

North Korean Athletes Will March With South Koreans At Pyeongchang Olympics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578548087/578599481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In December at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea, a man walks by a TV report about North Korea's missile launch with images of U.S. President Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. On Wednesday, Trump and Moon spoke by phone and Trump expressed openness to U.S.-North Korea talks "at the appropriate time, under the right circumstances." Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Jin-man/AP

South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myung-gyun (left) shakes hands with North Korean chief delegate Ri Son Gwon after their meeting Tuesday at the village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two countries. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

North And South Korea Reach Breakthroughs In First High-Level Talks In 2 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576767432/576858298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A giant North Korean flag flutters from a 528-foot pole near the border with South Korea. Tunnels built by North Korea's military are believed to extend across the border. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

As North Korea Tensions Rise, U.S. Army Trains Soldiers To Fight In Tunnels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576542410/576669393" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon, left, shakes hands with the head of North Korean delegation Ri Son-Gwon before their meeting at the Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone on Tuesday in Panmunjom, South Korea. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

A South Korean government official checks the hotline to talk with the North Korean side at the border village of Panmunjom on January 3. South Korea says North Korea has agreed to meet at the village next week. Handout from South Korean government/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout from South Korean government/Getty Images

North And South Korea Plan First Talks In 2 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/575852219/575876652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript