South Korea South Korea

Reporting from a Seoul cat cafe, one of the many themed cafes in Japan and Korea. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Haeryun Kang/for NPR

Reporter's Notebook: Settling In In Seoul

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460896508/461352948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Relatives of Korean women forced into Japanese-run brothels during World War II demonstrate outside the foreign ministry in Seoul, South Korea, on Monday. The two countries announced a deal that included an apology from the Japanese prime minister and a fund to support the 46 surviving Korean women. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

Hundreds of police officers outside Jogyesa, Seoul's top Buddhist temple, as a deadline passed for a labor leader holed up inside to turn himself in. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Haeryun Kang/for NPR

Younger students cheer on high school seniors as they head to the all-important college entrance exam on Thursday. As usual, police offered escorts for students who were running late. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

Even The Planes Stop Flying For South Korea's National Exam Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455708201/455797513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. and South Korean soldiers of the combined 2nd Infantry Division train at Camp Red Cloud in Uijeongbu, South Korea. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

For South Korea-U.S. Summit, The Big Question Is Still North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/448855000/448981072" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Songdo, outside Seoul, was envisioned as a futuristic international business hub, drawing residents from all over the world. Instead, this young city has become populated mostly by Koreans. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ari Shapiro/NPR

A South Korean City Designed For The Future Takes On A Life Of Its Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444749534/445048735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Armed South Korean soldiers cross a bridge on a truck in the border town of Paju, South Korea, on Sunday, as negotiators from the South and North Korea resumed talks. EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
EPA/Landov

An undated composite photograph showing the delegates at the Panmunjom talks on Saturday. (Left to right) South Korean National Security Adviser Kim Kwan-jin, South Korean Unification Minister Hong Yong-pyo, Hwang Pyong-so, the North Korean military's top political officer and Kim Yang-gon, the top North Korean official in charge of inter-Korean affairs. EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
EPA/Landov

A shop at Seoul's Namdaemun's market where electric fans are sold. Despite scientists who tell them it's safe, many older South Koreans believe that it's dangerous to go to sleep with an electric fan on and never do so. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ari Shapiro/NPR

South Korea's Quirky Notions About Electric Fans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/430341089/430890838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript