South Korea South Korea

Noor Rashid Ibrahim (left) of the Royal Malaysian Police speaks about one of the North Korean suspects, with Selangor state police chief Abdul Samah Mat looking on, in Kuala Lumpur on Sunday. Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images

Lee Jae-yong (center), vice chairman of Samsung Electronics, arrives Monday for questioning as a suspect in the corruption scandal that led to the impeachment of South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and Defense Secretary James Mattis speak on Inauguration Day. Mattis travels to South Korea and Japan this week in the administration's first major foreign trip. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

The 'America First' President Sends His Defense Secretary To Asia

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Jay Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung, arrives at the Seoul Central District Court on January 18. A judge said there wasn't enough evidence for his arrest on bribery charges. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

J.Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung Electronics, arrives at the office of the independent counsel last Thursday in Seoul, South Korea. Prosecutors are now seeking an arrest warrant for Lee. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Arrest Warrant Sought For Samsung Heir In S. Korean Presidential Bribery Scandal

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Workers in Seoul's Yongsan ward office wait in a parking garage for an all-clear sign during a recent air raid drill. Concerned about a possible attack by North Korea, the South Koreans hold the drills twice a year. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In S. Korea, Air Raid Drills Are A Reminder Of N. Korean Threat

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The Asiatic black bear is now an endangered species, after being captured in the wild and farmed for its bile. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Bears That Inspired 'Adorable' Korean Paralympic Mascot Live In Caged Captivity

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A statue of a girl symbolizing Korean "comfort women" is unveiled last week during a ceremony in front of the Japanese Consulate in Busan, South Korea. The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images

South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye attends an emergency Cabinet meeting on Friday in Seoul. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

South Korea Impeaches President, But Political Drama Isn't Finished

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South Korean President Park Geun-hye is shown during a Nov. 29 televised address. The country's first female leader was impeached on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

South Korean Lawmakers Vote Overwhelmingly To Impeach President

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Protesters carry a portrait of South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye during a rally against Park in central Seoul on Saturday. Hundreds of thousands of protestors marched in Seoul for the sixth straight week on December 3, to demand the ouster and arrest of scandal-hit President Park Geun-Hye ahead of an impeachment vote in parliament. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

South Korean President Park Geun-Hye bows during an address to the nation, at the presidential Blue House in Seoul last month. Park said she is willing to stand down early and would let parliament decide on her fate. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Vote To Impeach South Korea's President Expected This Week

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South Korean President Park Geun-Hye bows during an address to the nation, at the presidential Blue House in Seoul. South Korea's scandal-hit president said Tuesday she was willing leave office before the end of her term and would let parliament decide on her fate. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images