South Korea South Korea

A religious activist is carried away by police after he tried to stop a gay pride parade in Seoul last year. Christian activists are planning to disrupt the parade again this year. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Showdown Looms At South Korea's Gay Pride Parade

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South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se (left) speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at their meeting in Tokyo. The two countries are marking the 50th anniversary of establishing relations. While leaders in both countries stressed the importance of the ties, a bitter history continues to strain the relationship. Issei Kato/AP hide caption

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Issei Kato/AP

Best Frenemies: Japan, Korea Mark 50th Anniversary Despite Rivalry

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The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome is slowing down in South Korea, but people were still wearing surgical masks around Seoul on Monday. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Airport guards go on patrol wearing masks at Gimpo International Airport in Seoul on Friday. South Korea has announced one more death, but no new cases of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

A medical staff member wearing a protective suit waits to enter an isolation ward for patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in South Korea. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MERS Is A Health Crisis With Political And Economic Costs

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A woman on a street in Seoul checks her cellphone. The government is ramping up efforts to control an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome by monitoring the smartphones of those under quarantine. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Creepy Or Comforting? South Korea Tracks Smartphones To Curb MERS

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In front of the emergency room at the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, medical workers care for a man suspected of having the Middle Respiratory syndrome on Monday. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Patient one: A businessman brought the Middle East respiratory syndrome to South Korea in early May. Since then, he has likely spread the virus to more than 20 other people. Several of those have passed the virus onto others. Maia Majumder/Health Map hide caption

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Maia Majumder/Health Map

Viral Superspreader? How One Man Triggered A Deadly MERS Outbreak

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A student wearing a face mask stands in a public square in Seoul on June 3. More than 200 primary schools shut down as South Korea has struggled to contain an outbreak of the MERS virus. ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images

MERS In South Korea Is Bad News But It's Not Yet Time To Panic

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Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

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A South Korean walks through a market in Seoul wearing a mask. South Korean President Park Geun-Hye scolded health officials over their "insufficient" response to an outbreak of the MERS virus. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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South Koreans Mask Up In The Face Of MERS Scare

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In this photo from 2014, passengers walk past the Middle East respiratory syndrome quarantine area at Manila's International Airport in the Phillipines. The virus is now raising public concern in South Korea. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Aaron Favila/AP

Gloria Steinem and South Korean peace activists march along a military fence at a checkpoint after crossing the border separating North and South Korea. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Controversy Follows As Activists Cross North-South Korean Border

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South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint news conference following meetings at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Seoul. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

In Seoul, Kerry Calls N. Korea Provocations 'Egregious,' 'Reckless'

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On Sunday, about 70 marchers gathered at Seoul's City Hall Square to raise attention for South Korea's single moms. The annual event is in its fifth year. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

South Korea's Single Moms Struggle To Remove A Social Stigma

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