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House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer supports raising member and staff pay, as well as reviving earmarks. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump said Thursday he would "probably have to veto" the resolution blocking his emergency declaration to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Vows Veto After Congress Blocks His Order To Build Border Wall

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Wells Fargo CEO Timothy Sloan faced hours of questioning Tuesday from both Republicans and Democrats on the House Financial Services Committee. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump delivered his second State of the Union address Tuesday with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Vice President Pence behind him. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

7 Takeaways From President Trump's State Of The Union Address

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The White House And Congress React To The Explosive Cohen Allegations

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Union members and other federal employees protest in front of the White House on Thursday. Many are out of work as the partial government shutdown has dragged on longer than any in history. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Rep. Rashida Tlaib (center), wearing a traditional Palestinian robe, takes the oath of office on a Quran at the start of the 116th Congress at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., listens to testimony at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in September. Harris, along with Sens. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Tim Scott, R-S.C., proposed the anti-lynching bill passed by the Senate on Wednesday. Tom Williams/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/Pool/Getty Images

Abigail Spanberger, Democratic candidate for Virginia's 7th District in the U.S. House of Representatives, thanks supporters at an election night rally. Spanberger declared victory over Republican incumbent Dave Brat. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A Record Number Of Women Will Serve In Congress (With Potentially More To Come)

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President Trump has refused to divest himself of businesses and investments that could pose conflicts of interest. For example, the Trump International Hotel (seen here), located just blocks from the White House, regularly hosts events with foreign diplomats, interest groups and industry associations. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

If approved, the agreement would postpone the debate over money for President Trump's border wall until December, when a lame-duck Congress will be in place. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Rashida Tlaib (shown in 2008) served as a Michigan state legislator for six years. On Tuesday, Democrats picked her to run unopposed for the congressional seat held by former Rep. John Conyers for more than 50 years. Tlaib would be the first Muslim woman in Congress. Al Goldis/AP hide caption

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Al Goldis/AP