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As a staff member takes down the Arizona redistricting map, Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission chair Colleen Mathis gets a hug from Frank Bergen, a Pima County Democrat, at a 2012 meeting. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

People celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Friday after its historic 5-4 decision on same-sex marriage. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Rulings, Confederate Flag, Mark Shift In Culture Wars

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American Journalist James Foley, pictured in 2011. Foley's beheading at the hands of the Islamic State militant group has forced a debate over how the U.S. balances its policy of not paying ransoms. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Obama Administration To Shift Ransom-For-Hostages Rules

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Supporters of the Affordable Care Act rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The Supreme Court is considering the case of King v. Burwell, which could determine the fate of health care subsidies for millions of people. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, and fellow Democratic members of Congress hold a news conference to voice their opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks to reporters on May 31 after leaving the Senate floor, where he spoke about surveillance legislation. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Americans Say They Want The Patriot Act Renewed ... But Do They, Really?

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To study the draft Trans-Pacific Partnership language, senators have to go to the basement of the Capitol and enter a secured, soundproof room in this hallway and surrender their mobile devices. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang/NPR

A Trade Deal Read In Secret By Only A Few (Or Maybe None)

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Dream Action Coalition Co-director Cesar Vargas, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in 2014. He wants immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to later be allowed to serve in the military. AP hide caption

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AP

GOP Split Over Bill To Let Immigrants In U.S. Illegally Serve In Military

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More than 80 percent of the people getting federal subsidies to defray the cost of their monthly health insurance premiums have jobs, statistics suggest. And many are middle class. Jen Grantham/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jen Grantham/iStockphoto

Low, Middle Income Workers Most Vulnerable To Loss Of Obamacare Subsidies

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State Sens. Warren Limmer (left) and Bill Ingebrigtsen talk in the Senate chamber. Limmer said he has been scolded for looking at his colleagues during debate before, and had "to beg forgiveness to the Senate president." David J. Oakes/Minnesota State Senate hide caption

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David J. Oakes/Minnesota State Senate

What Eye Contact — And Dogs — Can Teach Us About Civility In Politics

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is facing questions about money, access and influence while she was secretary of state. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Clinton Faces Bad Headlines And More Questions Of Scandal

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