Bollywood Bollywood

This selfie is in the toilet: Actor Akshay Kumar poses with the object of his bride's affection in the new movie Toilet: A Love Story. T-Series via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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T-Series via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Sonata Director Aparna Sen is a veteran of the small, artistic cinema. She says while mainstream films often "commodify" women, "the good news is that many different films are now being made about women" and by women who are starting their own production companies. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

Feminist Films Push Boundaries In India

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Female Wrestlers Are Unlikely Heroines Of Bollywood's Biggest Smash

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Priyanka Chopra plays Alex Parrish in ABC's Quantico. Phillippe Bosse/ABC hide caption

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Phillippe Bosse/ABC

From Bollywood To Hollywood: Shattering Stereotypes On The Silver Screen

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Bollywood actress Katrina Kaif speaks during a media conference in Mumbai, India, in 2013. In her latest film, Kaif plays an aid worker for "Medicine International" who helps an Indian soldier track assassinate a terrorist mastermind. Divyakant Solanki/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Divyakant Solanki/EPA/Landov

The author's mother, Reba Roy (far left), dancing on stage in a sari as a young woman. Courtesy of Sandip Roy hide caption

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Courtesy of Sandip Roy

Love Is Saying 'Sari': The Quest To Save A South Asian Tradition

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The Indian Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the conviction of Bollywood actor Sanjay Dutt for his role in the 1993 Mumbai blasts that killed more than 200 people. Chamila Karunarathne/AP hide caption

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Chamila Karunarathne/AP